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Page 4 Eat Well & Prosper T


he domestication of chicken, starting 4,000 years ago in Western Asia, spread rap-


idly. On 3,700 year old tablets, in- scriptions of several ancient poul- try recipes were dug up in ancient Persia. One was for a roasted bird with a side dish of specially fl avored soſt bread. T e Romans were


avid in-the-bird stuff ers. Apicius, a true bon vivant, fl ourished in the 1st century A.D.. T is Roman chef would stuff any- thing including chicken, hare, pig and even a dormouse. His lav- ish banquets lead to his eventual bankruptcy and suicide. Early names for animal cavity include


mixtures “farce”, used


around 1390 and “stuffi ng” which fi rst appeared around 1538. En- gland’s King Henry VIII regaled his French counterpart with “cockentrice”, a capon head on a pigs body, stuff ed and roasted! T e word


“forcemeat” was used to describe stuffi ng in 1688. And stuffi ng be-


came a traditional part of our T anksgiving dinner around 1836. Boston cookbooks of this time have oyster based stuffi ng recipes and stuffi ng made with mashed potatoes and bread crumbs.


inated from a dish called “kush” cooked by slaves forced over from north and west Africa. Poultry stuffi ng oſt en consists


u O


EmploYee OwnEd


oliver's market est. 1988


s “A SEASONED MIXTURE”


“Dressing” is a relatively new word describing stuffi ng in the South. Southerners oſt en use corn bread for their mixture. T is orig-


of dried bread, giblets or sausage meat, onions, celery, spices and herbs, particularly sage. Popular additions in the United Kingdom are fruit and nuts, more specifi cally apricots, al- monds and chestnuts. Designing-your-own


stuffi ng mix begins with your choice of bread. Whatever you choose, tear it into 1”pieces and let dry overnight on baking sheet. A protein like the giblets, bacon or sausage lends the stuffi ng crispy bites and their fat con- tributes fl avor.


No stuffi ng is complete with-


out celery and onions, and some would say sage. If you want depth to your mix, consider adding leeks and/or hardy greens to you sauté pan. Deglazing those brown bits from the bottom of the pan, those fl avor bombs, is essential. Use dry sherry, white wine, apple cider vinegar or chicken stock for that purpose. If you want to in- corporate textual contrasts and bold fl avor hits try adding fresh chopped thyme, tarragon or chili peppers, chopped toasted nuts, dried cranberries or cherries. Fresh shucked oysters provides an intriguing addition. Adding a combination of but-


ter, eggs and stock gives a rich, custard quality and helps ensure a crunchy top and bottom. Mix and match whatever ingredients you like, using the attached basic stuffi ng recipe.


Stuffi ng is my favorite food in the world! I actually


have been known to go buy stuffi ng and make it in the middle of summer. Emma Roberts


4 • November 2018 • UPBEAT TIMES, INC. November 2018


EW & P Recipe


Simple Stuffing


Basic Recipe


1 loaf bread, torn into pieces and allowed to dry. 8 oz. chopped bacon/pancetta or 12 oz. of sausage, casings removed.


Place bread and


any add-ins in a large bowl. Heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in large skillet over medium heat. Cook meat, breaking up into small pieces if needed, until browned and cooked through, 7-10 minutes. Use slotted spoon to transfer to bowl with bread mixture. Add 2 chopped onions and 4 chopped celery stalks and any bonus aromat- ics to same skillet, until onions are softened, 10-12 minutes. Scrape aromatics into bread mixture.


Return skillet to medium heat and deglaze with 1/2 cup of liquid. Add 1/2 cup butter, un- til melted. Drizzle over bread mixture. Whisk 2 eggs and 2 cups chicken stock in me- dium bowl and add to bread mixture. Season with salt and pepper and toss to combine, adding more stock as needed to ensure bread is fully hy- drated. Transfer to prepared buttered baking dish and dot with 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces. Cover with parchment and foil and bake in preheated 350 degree oven for 35 minutes. Remove foil, increase oven temp to 450 degrees and bake until crispy on top. 8 servings. USDA recommends cooking stuffi ng outside of bird only.


“The secret of happiness is not in doing what one likes, but in liking what one does.” ! ~ James Matthew Barrie


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