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FAMILY


Oh, they do love to be beside the


seaside J. SHAW ANTIQUES


Celebrating 50 years buying & selling antiques and fine arts


ALWAYS WANTED


any antique and retro furniture, clocks, paintings, porcelain, pottery, silver and bronze.


Bereaved homes cleared to your specification.


Free valuation on items brought in between 10am and 12 noon Saturdays.


Tel: 01709 522340 Email: sales@johnshawantiques.co.uk


Regardless of tropical getaways or action-packed city breaks, nothing beats the nostalgia of remembering that very first trip to the Great British seaside.


• Antique furniture


• Vinyls, records and instruments • Pottery and ceramics • Art and enamel signs • Toys and figures • Jewellery including handmade pieces


• Vintage clothing and homewares • Taxidermy • Plus much more Constantly updated stock


We buy gold and silver


Come and explore our 4,000sq ft antiques centre You never know what you might find


ng


Helping you maintain your health


Official stockists of CBD Cannabis oil and tablets


The Basement, 16 Doncaster Road, Barnsley S70 1TH (Just off the Alhambra Roundabout) Tel. 01226 730077


www.barnsleyantiquescentre.co.uk Open six days from 10am (Closed Thursday) | Find us on Facebook


And for the residents of The


Porterbook care home in Sheffield, those memories came sailing back in like a bottle washed up on the salty shores during their latest summer trip to the coastal town of Cleethorpes. Organised by the care staff as part of their extensive activities programme, the residents reveled in some old fashioned fun as they took part in all of our favourite seaside rituals; from eating ice creams and fish and chips to strolling along the prom, prom, prom – tiddely-om-pom- pom!


They say salt water cures all wounds, but research has found that a trip to the coast offers more than just a fun day out, having a wide range of health benefits for the elderly, particularly those with dementia.


Sea air has been proven to improve the respiratory system and skin, aid circulation and strengthen the immune system. The sound of sea waves has shown to play a role in rejuvenating the mind and body by altering the wave patterns in the brain and enabling a deeply relaxed state.


While the sun boosts vitamin D levels to improve bone health. But the main reason for staff choosing a trip to the beach was to bring back the memories of family holidays gone-by.


Much like the feeling of sand between our toes, it doesn’t matter how much time has passed or how much we or the resort have changed, looking out across the beach still feels the same as the first time we experienced it. Transporting residents back to when life was simpler, they were reminded of happy times of children riding donkeys down the seafront, endless hours with a bucket and spade or collecting shells and pebbles, and even honeymoons to the coast. The Porterbrook care home manager Sheilagh Sweeney said: “We purposely chose Cleethorpes for the day out because it’s such a delightfully traditional seaside town. “We know our residents enjoy remembering their own beach holidays and there were lots of happy conversations about sandcastles and swimming in the sea – they are still talking about the fun they had now.”


For more information about The Porterbrook, call Sheilagh on 0114 266 0808 or visit www.theporterbrookcare.com


aroundtownmagazine.co.uk 57


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