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Once so eloquently described as ‘next level shit’ by Grandmaster Flash, British electronic duo Addictive TV create music with a difference; it’s music you can see. They’ve been travelling round the world for five years, meeting and recording samples from over 200 musicians, and have worked their technological wizardry on them to create a live show that mixes them all together to make pieces. It’s marvellous, and its coming to Norwich Arts Centre this month. I spoke to Graham and Mark about where the idea came from, who their influences have been and what piece of technological kit they most wish existed.


B


asically what you do as a duo is to blend images and music together using


samples. Who has inspired you in terms of musicians, videographers and musical innovators? Mark: Musically speaking, although not directly influencing our work as Addictive TV, I’ve personally been inspired by all genres of music but primarily late 60’s psychedelia, late 70’s pop with bands like XTC but also soundtracks from 60’s/70’s science-fiction and exploitation movies. Graham: I’ve always been influenced by science fiction and the earliest of electronic musicians since I was a kid like Vangelis and Kraftwerk. In the early days I’d say Emergency Broadcast Network from New York were influential and also Canadian


12 / JUNE 2017 / OUTLINEONLINE.CO.UK


DJ and producer Akufen. Where did the idea for Orchestra of Samples come from? I’ve seen something similar before, but nothing quite like this. Mark: Tere have been similar projects that may contain a basic element of what we’ve done with Orchestra of Samples but in no way have they even scratched the surface of how far we’ve taken things. Our creative approach is simply seeing which samples work together. Te whole idea is an exploration into musical probability, about bringing together really different musicians who wouldn’t normally play together, and more to the point their instruments which wouldn’t normally be heard together! It’s far more than just different people in different countries playing together and I’ve


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