This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
research report could consist of the spoken (recorded) word, perhaps with a video of someone explaining previous research findings or analysing research outcomes.


The importance of multimodal communication was highlighted by the New London Group (NLG) in 2000 in their book ‘A Pedagogy of New Literacies: Designing Social Futures’. The NLG highlighted the importance of ‘design’ as opposed to ‘writing’ to convey what we do when we communicate multimodally. As such, this eGuide will support you to design action research approaches and reports, using a range of modes which it is likely you will mix together. For example, you might produce a presentation-style report, which includes embedded sound and images and can be accessed online. The guide will also illustrate how these research methods and reports can be done in a participatory way, e.g. involving co-researchers and research participants in making decisions and analysing research findings.


Participatory research methods and reporting approaches


The difference between a research method and a reporting approach is not always easy to discern. If, for example, you asked some learners to speak about their feelings on a certain teaching approach and recorded it, this audio you ‘captured’ would be a research method. An audio recording of your reflections on what these and other learners were expressing could be part of a research report. Research approaches become participatory if, for example, you ask the learners (research participants) to record their own audio clips and/ or help you analyse what they and others meant when they were speaking.


Multimodal approaches in teaching and learning


It is particularly important to consider multimodal approaches in the context of education and training. This is because the mixed use of sound, touch, sight and movement are already widely accepted as ‘inclusive learning’ strategies to meet, what is commonly known, as different people's ‘learning styles’ (audio, kinesthetic, etc.). This means that, not


3


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49