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USWCA NEWS Presidency was rewarding year in ‘Heart of Curling’ By Carol Stevenson, USWCA President


come an active member of the organization. At first I served as a Wis- consin representative on the Five and Under Women’s Challenge Committee. Eventually I became involved in more committees until I became an official USW- CA representative from my home club, Kettle Moraine. One summer I was


I


curling with a newly- elected USWCA presi- dent. She remarked that if one ever had the chance to serve as USWCA president, she should jump at it. When the opportunity arose for me, her statement came flooding back. Te sport of curling allows for many opportu- nities for service and if you are of the volunteer-


Carol Stevenson, USWCA outgoing president


n the summer of 1996 then-United States Women’s Curling Association (USWCA) President Judy Maier invited me to be-


ing nature, as I am, you have many avenues for giving back. I have served my club as treasurer and president of our women’s organization. I also sat for a term on the club board. I have been the Kettle Moraine Kettles Badger representative and also worked as a USCA official. Tese vari- ous volunteer jobs have been deeply rewarding experiences. Troughout these past years, I have worked


with a wonderful group of ladies from diverse backgrounds who possess amazing skills. Te talent of our organization’s membership is sec- ond to none. Tat so many of our membership contribute to the success of the USWCA is a tes- tament to the success that we enjoy as a whole. We benefit from the work and guidance of mem- bers and officers for many years aſter they have been active in the sport or have stepped down from leadership roles. Te fact that we enjoy this continued participation is one of our greatest strengths. Te work of the 2016-17 year has been shared


by a dedicated and hard-working team. As presi- dent, I have received support from Secretary Judi Page, Meeting Coordinator Nancy Wilhelm and


Webmaster Dae Jahnke. Tese ladies, along with the current officers and committee chairs who- worked through the year contribute to continu- ous and smooth transition from one term of of- ficers to another.


In memoriam: Tis season, we recognize the passing of Past


Presidents Isobel Rapaich, Marion Leifer, Au- drey Peterson, and Jeanne Farner, as well as Past Secretary Lee Ladd. I have been honored to rep- resent the USWCA in paying respect to these la- dies, who continued to be engaged in our organi- zation long aſter their respective terms in office. It has been a busy and rewarding year. I look


forward to the year to come as the reins of lead- ership pass to 2017-18 USWCA President Dawn Gutro. I wish Dawn a full and productive year, and look forward to working with her and her dedicated team. I look forward to continuing with this vital organization in the future and I embrace the opportunity to work in new capaci- ties within the USWCA. It has been a privilege to be the 2016-17


USWCA president and I happy to have been at “Te Heart of Curling.” Q


Five & under season’s fabulous finish By Millie Buege, USWCA


in style. Te Detroit Curling Club (DCC), one of the oldest curling clubs in Michigan, held its two-day open event on Jan. 21-22 with 16 teams. Te Lopez rink from Detroit won the first event, with Josh Lopez, Ken German, Chris Golec, and Denis Metty. Runners-up were the Mann Team from the Mayfield Curling Club with Michael Mann, Jeff Ostrander, Paul Tecco, and Ed Os- trander. DCC made the final extra special by pip- ing the finalists out on the ice. In the West I Area, the Duluth (Minn.) Curl-


F


ing Club hosted its first ever Five & Under Open Challenge on Jan. 20-23. Te three-day event boasted an impressive turnout with 24 teams. Te winners from Eau Claire, Wis., were skip Zach Oliphant, Spencer Eklund, Tyler Ronstad, and Nathan Oster. Tey won a trophy as well as pins. Te runners-up were from the Duluth Curl- ing Club with Lars Benson, Nate Lehman, Rob Anderson, and Neil Olsen. In Wisconsin, the Blackhawk Curling Club in Janesville hosted a women’s challenge on Feb.


our United States Women’s Curling As- sociation (USWCA)-sponsored 5-and- under bonspiels rounded out the season


24-26. Tis was the first time the Wisconsin Area has hosted a USWCA-sponsored Women’s 5 & Under in almost 20 years. Ten teams participat- ed. Te winners of the First Event were from the Madison Curling Club: Mandy Hampton, Steph- anie Sears, Kim Slininger, and Jacquee Blaz. Te runners-up were also from Madison: Andie Mc Donald, Emily Wood, Andrianna Crawford, and Josie Greve. Evergreen (Ore.) Curling Club (West II area)


hosted the final Five & Under Open Challenge of the year on March 24-26. Sixteen teams par- ticipated from across the nation, including teams from Texas, Wisconsin, California, Washington, and Alaska. Te First Event winners from the Granite Curling Club in Seattle were: Stephen Grant, Aaron Tompson, Derek Ristau, and Gina Triolo. Te First Event runners-up from Madison (Wis.) were Lauren Leckewee, Brad Orego, Allan Veler, and Nate Schwante. Tis was Evergreen’s first experience hosting a USWCA- sponsored 5 & Under bonspiel. Congratulations to all the 2016-17 5 & Under


bonspiel finalists, and thank you to all the host clubs and participants for making it a wonderful season!Q


Josh Lopez, Ken German, Chris Golec, and Denis Metty won Detroit’s Five-and-Under Bonspiel.


West I Region Five and Under champs were Eau Claire’s Zach Oliphant, Spencer Eklund, Tyler Ronstad, and Nathan Oster.


USA Curling (( 21


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