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Powerful Living Home for a Hero Photo by Amy Nix/ECOEC Photo by Katherine Russell /ECOEC


East Central Oklahoma Electric Cooperative (ECOEC) based in Okmulgee, is a proud sponsor of Oklahoma’s fi rst home construction project under Operation Finally Home, an initiative to build homes for wounded, ill or injured veterans. Ronny and Claudia Sweger were the recipients of a beautiful home in Bixby, Okla. The home will be serviced by ECOEC.


Secretary of State Chris Benge Honored by Electric Cooperatives


Photo by Hayley Leatherwood


The National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s Statewide Editors Association awarded Oklahoma Living magazine ‘Best Personality Profi le’ for a feature published in February 2015, “The Statesman.” The story was a feature highlighting Oklahoma Secretary of State Chris Benge. Chris Meyers, general manager for the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, presented Secretary Benge with the award. To read the feature, visit www.oaec.coop


Winter Fuel Outlook


According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA), residential consumers who use electricity as their primary source of heat will spend an average of $930 on heating costs from October 2015 through March 2016—a decrease of $30 in average costs compared with the same period one year ago. EIA reports 39 percent of all U.S. households rely on electricity for heat, ranging from 15 percent in the Northeast to 63 percent in the South. Meteorologists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are forecasting winter temperatures:


13 percent warmer in the Northeast 11 percent warmer in the Midwest 8 percent warmer in the South


NOVEMBER 2015 5


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