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OCTOBER


Pawhuska National Indian Taco Championship


Each year, the town of Pawhuska,


Okla., comes together for good food and family fun during the National Indian Taco Championship. Festival goers not only have a chance to sam- ple the traditional Native food—for $5 they can register as a judge and help select the winning taco. Tacos entered into the competition must be traditional style. But the vendors can add their own modern twists when selling to the community. “This year, one of them served the Indian Taco with a spicy drizzle on top. It tasted amazing,” says Reba Bueno, a festival committee member.


Participants also enjoy Native American dancing as part of the National Indian Taco Powwow, plus goat roping and a variety of activities for kids.


“It’s a unique opportunity to see


the rich culture of the powwow and enjoy the food at the same time,” Bueno says. “Make sure to bring an appetite.” The 12th annual National Indian


Taco Championship will take place Oct. 1, 2016, in downtown Pawhuska.


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NOVEMBER


Muskogee Boare’s Heade Feaste


For a medieval feast in 21st centu-


ry Oklahoma, there’s only one place to go—the Castle of Muskogee’s an- nual Boare’s Heade Feaste in Muskogee, Okla.


“It’s a real 1600s castle experi- ence,” says event coordinator Karen Cunningham. Participants are invited to come in


medieval dress for a hearty four- course dinner. The meal begins with a cheese plate, followed by a soup course, a pork chop with potato wedges and corn on the cob for the main dish, and a delicious dessert to conclude. For added authenticity, the meal is served medieval style. “Diners use their hands like they would have in the 1600s,” Cunningham says. “There are no utensils.” The evening is replete with enter- tainment as Queen Elizabeth and King James preside over the festivi- ties, which include magic, comedy and dancing. Even the waitstaff serve as table entertainers. Tickets are on sale for the 2015 festival, which will be held Nov. 21. The 2016 event is scheduled for Nov. 19.


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Minco Honey Festival DECEMBER


Known as the “land of milk and


honey,” the community of Minco, Okla., celebrates its unique agricul- tural roots each December during the Minco Honey Festival. Ross Honey, the largest honey plant in Oklahoma, is located in Minco and Braum’s Dairy is headquartered just outside the town. Honey-themed activities include free tours of the honey plant, which is owned by Jim and Glenda Ross. Their son, Lucas Ross, a comedian and Emmy Award-winning TV per- sonality, attends the festival’s arts and crafts show each year, held at Minco High School. There is also a honey bakeoff, and honey baskets are available for purchase. Braum’s offers milk and cheese samples on festival day.


In addition to the honey plant, Minco is home to the NextEra Energy wind farm. During the festi- val, they offer tours of the wind farm, even giving participants a chance to go inside the tower of a wind turbine. The Great Plains Cotton Gin in Minco offers tours as well.


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“It’s a family-friendly, agricul- ture-oriented, old-fashioned day,” says Minco Chamber of Commerce Vice President Nancy Malcom. Children’s activities include a kid- dy tractor pull, a “Little Miss Honey Bee” pageant, and a visit from Santa Claus. Festivalgoers also enjoy a quilt show, an “antiques roadshow” with the opportunity to have an- tiques appraised, plus local shop- ping and home-town eateries. The 25th annual festival will take


place Dec. 5, 2015, in downtown Minco. The 2016 Honey Festival will take place on Dec. 3.


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