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■ INSIDE


Kilowatt A


NOVEMBER 2014 Published for members of Kiwash Electric Cooperative


A supplement to Oklahoma Living


Emergency Power for Kiwash and Others


2,500 kW generator installed near the B&K Baithouse west of Clinton will provide emergency power to Foss Lake Conservatory


and ensure water supplies continue to flow to Bessie, Clinton, Cordell and Hobart during a major power outage. Owned by Kiwash Electric Cooperative and its power supplier Western Farmers Electric Cooperative (WFEC), the generator is also capable of providing emergency power to homes and businesses from Highway 183 to Stafford and the Foss Lake area.


Kiwash Electric General Manager Dennis Krueger said the co-op can rely on the generator if WFEC transmission lines are knocked out after a storm. It will also help WFEC reduce its system-wide electricity demand by cycling on during periods of extreme electricity use. WFEC will supplement their generation by installing numerous generators of this size over its territory.


A Kiwash employee lowers the 2,500 kW generator that will provide emergency power to homes and businesses in the Foss Lake area, including Foss Lake Conservatory.


Across the US, electric co-ops are working toward a similar goal. With load cycling programs such as Kiwash Electric’s Peak Buster program, geothermal HVAC rebates and other measures that lower the demand for electricity, co-ops hope to postpone the need to build new and expensive power plants. For more details on Peak Buster, please see page 3.


Cost of Service Study Underway


Kiwash Electric Cooperative has hired an independent utility consulting firm to analyze the co-op’s current rate structure. The cost of service study will review co- op rates to determine if they are fair and equitable to all classes of consumers, and sufficient to cover rising costs in the future.


Following the evaluation, the firm will present their findings to the Kiwash Electric board of trustees for further review and consideration. A previous Kiwash Electric cost of service study


in 2009 resulted in a slight increase in rates. Since that time, the co-op has witnessed con- siderable hikes in the cost of construction ma- terials and equipment necessary to build and maintain power lines. Wholesale power prices, too, are expected to go up as the EPA enforces costly regulations on power plant emissions.


Cost of service studies are common practice for utilities as they strive to balance the rising costs of doing business. Please watch your newsletter for more details.





Therapy dogs attest to the healing power of animals. page 2


Sign up for Peak Buster and earn cash back on your electric bill. page 3


For happy holidays, keep your kitchen free of hazards page 4


Kiwash Electric Cooperative PO Box 100 • 120 West 1st Street Cordell, Oklahoma


tele: (888) 832-3362 www.kiwash.coop


OFFICE HOURS: Monday-Friday, 7:30 am - 5:30 pm.


POWER OUTAGE HOT LINE 888-832-3362


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Jack Sawatzky, President


Robert Travis, Vice President John Schaufele, Secretary Treasurer Rex Eagan, Asst. Secretary Treasurer


Ralph Cunningham Jevon West


Dennis Krueger, General Manager PAYMENT OPTIONS


• •


Pay online at www.kiwash.coop.


Pay by phone by calling 855-875-7216. Available 24 hours a day. Visa or Mastercard.


• •


Pay in person at 120 West 1st St., Cordell, Monday - Friday, 7:30 am to 5:30 pm.


Pay via automatic draft of your checking or savings account. To sign up, please visit www.kiwash.coop or call 888-832-3362.


Pay at one of our authorized payment locations:


Custer City Hall Custer City, Oklahoma


First National Bank Thomas, Oklahoma


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