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Holiday Cooking Safety Tips T


he kitchen is the heart of the home. Sadly, it’s also where two out of every five home fires start. Many home fires occur during what’s supposed to be the happiest time of the year – the holidays. Tanksgiving, Christmas and Christmas Eve hold a tradition of cooking, and safety should always be considered in the kitchen. As the holiday season nears, TCEC and the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) urge everyone to use these simple safety tips to identify and correct potential kitchen hazards:


• Never leave cooking equipment unattended, and always remember to turn off • Supervise the little


burners when leaving the room.


ones closely in the kitchen. Make sure children stay at least three feet away from all cooking appliances.


• Prevent potential


fires by making sure the stovetop and oven are clean and free of grease, dust and spilled food.


• Remember to clean


the exhaust hood and duct over the stove on a regular basis.


• Keep the cooking


area around the stove and oven clear of combustibles, such as towels, napkins and potholders.


• Always wear short


or close-fitting sleeves when cooking. Loose clothing can catch fire.


• To protect from


spills and burns, use the back burners and turn the pot handles in, away from reaching hands.


COOKING SAFETY TIPS. PHOTO SOURCE: ESFI.ORG • Locate all appliances away from the sink.


CEO VIEW Continued from page one


Radiation, was quoted as saying the time extension comes, “because of the strong amount of interest we’ve seen from stakeholders.” McCabe said the agency has received more than 750,000 comments.


With 645 pages in the proposed rule and another 1,000 pages in supporting documents, stakeholders argued that more time was needed to be able to understand what the proposal was requiring and to adequately prepare comments.


TCEC’s goal is to have half its membership – 6,000 people – submit comments using www.action.coop. Members already have submitted nearly 1,700. There is still time for more voices to be heard.


This rule most negatively affects coal- fired power plants which produce the most carbon emissions and provide nearly 40 percent of the country’s electricity today – by far the largest single energy source.


It has been more than a year since the EPA abandoned an all-of-the-above strategy for an approach that effectively removes coal from the nation’s future fuel mix. A 2012 Congressional Budget Office report estimated the new standards on emissions would increase the cost of producing electricity from coal-fired plants by 75 percent.


• Plug countertop appliances into ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI)-protected outlets. • Keep appliance cords away from hot surfaces like the range or toaster. • Unplug the toaster and other countertop appliances when not in use.


• Be sure to turn off all appliances when cooking is completed. For more important safety tips to stay safe this holiday season and throughout the year, visit www.esfi.org.


Te Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) is a 501(c) (3) organization dedicated exclusively to promoting electrical safety in the home, school, and workplace. ESFI proudly engages in public education campaigns throughout the year to prevent electrical fires, injuries and fatalities.


There are many Tri-County Electric members who cannot afford the kind of increases in electric bills this proposed rule would generate. Joining more of TCEC’s 12,000-plus voices with those in the 900 other U.S. cooperatives will make a difference. Elected officials and rule makers already are hearing that the proposed rule will put many families in financial jeopardy.


The efforts of TCEC’s members and hundreds of thousands of others have created this brief pause in the regulatory process. Make the most of this grant of additional time and bring more voices to bear on this issue.


Visit Action.coop to show your support, share your thoughts and make our members voices heard. n


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