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Cimarron Employees Attend CPR Training


Replace windows before winter weather sneaks in


If you turned the heat on a little bit earlier this fall and it wasn’t really that cold, your windows could be at fault.


If you’re dreading higher utility bills that start coming in once the mercury drops, it could be your windows.


Windows cover up holes in your home’s walls. If yours are made from just a single pane of glass, they’re not going to keep winter outside.


OAEC’s Greg Hambrick demonstrates CPR chest compressions during CPR training.


Every year we go through training to stay pre- pared. An interesting note to remember. To do 100 chest compressions a minute, do them in time to the old Bee Gee’s song, “Staying Alive”!


Cimarron Electric Members Attend Focus Meeting With Oklahoma Living Staff


Before it gets too awfully cold, consider replacing your energy-ineffi cient, older-model windows with new, double-pane versions that will work twice as hard to keep the cold weather from sneaking into your house.


OAEC’s Sid Sperry, Anna Politano and Haley Leatherwood fi nd out what Cimarron Member’s think during focus group time.


“Electric cooperative’s have the highest customer satisfac-


tion rating over any other electric utility”, said Sid Sperry, OAEC Public Relations Director. Sid, Anna and Haley came out to Cimarron Electric to visit with our members and fi nd out what we thought. In addition to talking about the Oklahoma Living magazine, we also heard what our members thought about Ci- marron Electric and our own CEC News. Our members want to be informed about issues that will affect their electricity service and cost. They want to see more local pictures and stories. They like energy effi ciency and classifi ed ads.. More folks are looking at their co-op’s web sites to pay bills and fi nd out information. Thank you to all the members and OAEC’s folks who attended. Ok Assoc. of Electric Co-ops (OAEC) is our statewide cooperative.


A few tips as you shop for new windows: • Choose windows with Low-E glass. The special coating helps refl ect some of the interior heat back into the home and keep cold air out. A bonus: Some window brands don’t charge extra for Low-E glass. Look for windows that offer the coating as a standard feature. • Seriously, ditch your single-pane windows. The Department of Energy estimates that you could save up to $500 a year on your energy bills if you replace them with Energy Star-rated, double-pane windows. • When you get new windows, the installers will seal all around the glass and the window frames so cold air can’t seep inside and warm air can’t leak outdoors. Still, that caulking won’t last forever. Whether your windows are new or old, caulk around them every fall to keep the seal fresh.


• The same goes for doors. If yours isn’t closing properly, or if you feel a cold draft when you walk near it, seal it, too. If it’s really bad, think about getting a new one that isn’t cracked, warped or poorly fi tted. A snugly installed door also keeps energy bills lower.


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