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■ farm and garden november


Best days according to Moon phases.


Best planting days Above ground crops . . .


Root crops . . . . . . . . . . . . Seed beds . . . . . . . . . . . . Kill plant pests . . . . . . . . .


Best fishing days  Best . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


 Good . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Poor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


12-3, 22, 25-26, 29-30 6-7, 10-12, 18-21 10-12, 20-22 14-17


Folksy Tips, Hints & Wisdom


Putting the Garden To Bed Don’t forget these end-of-season tasks


Falling leaves tell us that it’s time to put away the garden tools until next year. Before your say good night to your garden, there are a few things you can do that will help it emerge next spring in great shape.


2-3, 10-12, 29-30 1, 6-7, 27-28


4-5, 8-9, 15-17, 20-22, 25-26 13-14, 18-19, 23-24


Best days to do other stuff Begin diet to gain weight . . . . . . . . . . . .


Begin diet to lose weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . Begin logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Breed animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Make sauerkraut, can, or pickle . . . . . . . Cut hair to discourage growth . . . . . . . . Cut hair to encourage growth . . . . . . . . Cut hay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Destroy pests and weeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . End projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Go camping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Graft or pollinate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Harvest above ground vegetables . . . . Harvest below ground vegetables . . . . Go to the dentist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plant above ground vegetables . . . . . . . Plant below ground vegetables . . . . . . . Prune to discourage growth . . . . . . . . . . Prune to encourage growth . . . . . . . . . . Quit smoking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Set posts or pour concrete . . . . . . . . . . . Start projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wean animals and children . . . . . . . . . . .


• Make good use of Mother Nature’s gifts. Those falling leaves offer a free source of soil nutrients that should be


used to boost the nutrients in your garden beds. They also provide a deep mulch layer to protect tender perennials, or add them to your compost and let the earth work its magic.


2, 29 15-16 24-25 20-21 10-11 17-18


1-2, 19 4-5 4-5


20-21 22-23 10-11 24-26 15-17 15-16


1-2, 29-30 20-21 13-14


4-5, 23 15-16 24-25 23-24 15-16


—from the Old Farmer’s Almanac •


If you’d prefer not to rake all those leaves, use your lawn mower to vacuum up leaves into a leaf bag and save the mixture of leaves and grass clippings for compost.


• Apply a thin layer of compost or aged manure to your lawn. •


• • •


Consider planting a cover crop such as annual rye grass or cloverin bare beds or vegetable gardens to improve the soil.


Before the first hard frost, enrich the soil by adding compost or well-aged manure, then seed with the cover crop. In spring, till the plants under a few weeks before planting.


As you clean up your beds, add annuals and potting soil from finished planters to your compost pile.


Plant spring-flowering bulbs. Tulips, daffodils, alliums, crocus and others can all be planted this time of year. Before planting, improve the soil with compost and bone meal to encourage spring flowering.





Try saving a few seeds from your healthiest plants and try your hand at seed starting next spring, either by broadcasting them over the soil in early spring, or starting them indoors under lights.





Clean your tools before you put them away. A thorough clean up should include your garden tools as well as favorite pots and containers. Disinfect them to ensure no plant diseases are carried over to the next year.


10 | november 2014


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