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MONTHLY REPORT Rural Electric taxes collected for


local schools (For September 2014 collections)


Choctaw Electric Cooperative gross receipts taxes are collected by the state and distributed to local schools. The amount each school receives is based on the number of miles of CEC line in the school district. Ninet-five percent is distributed to schools. The remaining five percent is retained by the state.


SCHOOL Lane School


Bennington School Grant School Swink School Boswell School Ft Towson School Soper School Hugo School


Whitesboro School Forest Grove School Lukfata School Glover School Denison School


Holly Creek School Idabel School


Haworth School Valliant School


Eagletown School Smithville School Wright City School Battiest School


Broken Bow School Nashoba School Rattan School Clayton School Antlers School Moyers School


TOTALS 95% paid to schools


5% State: 100% Coop:


CURRENT MONTH $2727.96


$187.77


$3108.97 $574.47 $1922.76 $4100.81 $3055.78 $4981.26 $217.78


$1742.26 $1268.28 $1502.88 $1106.64 $1420.13 $2807.99 $6040.17 $4176.51 $2157.37 $4357.47 $2228.52 $4382.48 $6055.62 $1637.92 $6646.23 $1257.82 $8035.22 $2637.03


$80,338.10 $4,228.32 $84,566.42


SOURCE: OKLAHOMA TAX COMMISSION


YEAR-TO-DATE $7009.25


$482.47 $7988.22 $1476.05 $4940.36 $10536.67 $7851.55 $12798.89 $559.57


$4476.58 $3258.73 $3861.51 $2843.43 $3648.90 $7214.87 $15519.67 $10731.18 $5543.17 $11196.12 $5725.98 $11260.38 $15559.37 $4208.48 $17076.89 $3231.85


$20645.78 $6775.62


$206,421.54 $10,864.30 $217,285.84


The Power of Electricity


As late as the mid-1930s, nine out of 10 rural homes still lacked electric service. Farmers milked cows by the dim light of the kerosene lantern, and wives slaved on the washboard. Without electricity, rural economies depended entirely on agriculture.


In 1933, things began to change. The federal government passed the Tennessee Valley Authority Act which authorized the construction of transmission lines to serve rural areas. President Franklin D. Roosevelt pioneered the power of electricity with the Rural Electrification Administration, and thanks to him, about 99 percent of the nation’s farms have electric service today.


Now, electricity is something you can count on every day, and Choctaw Electric is doing everything we can to keep it reliable and affordable.


Plug in to the power of membership at www.TogetherWeSave.com.


NOVEMBER Meter Reading and Billing Dates


Cycle Read C-1 C-2 C-3 C-4


11/1 11/8


11/15 11/22


Bill 11/6


11/13 11/20 11/26


Due


11/26 12/4


12/11 12/18


The billing chart above includes meter reading dates. Keeping track of meter reading dates allows you to evaluate your electrical usage over a precise billing period. We hope this will clear up billing questions.


Please see your electric bill for the current Power Cost Adjustment (PCA)


inside•your•co-op | 13


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