This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
■ co-op youth


Energizing Eighth Graders Teens build leadership skills at Oklahoma YouthPower Energy Camp


Community Events


Help us promote your event by sending event details in advance. Please send event information to Jennifer Boling/Inside Your Co-op/ PO Box 758, Hugo, OK 74743; or e-mail info to jboling@choctawelectric.coop. Events and dates are subject to change


FEBRUARY 9


10 12 18 27-28


MARCH 6


13 14-15 18


APRIL 4


4 4 6


CEC District D Meeting 6:30 pm, Wright City High School Auditorium


CEC District B Meeting 6:30 pm, Broken Bow High School Auditorium


CEC District A Meeting 6:30 pm, Haworth High School Cafeteria


AARP Safe Driving Course 9 am, CEC Hugo. To enroll, call 800-780-6486, ext. 248


Ft. Towson Living History Weekend at the old Fort


Energy Camp Essay Deadline Contact Brad Kendrick 800-780-6486, ext. 248.


Atoka Fire Truck Parade Court Street, Atoka


Gun Show, Sat. 9 am - 5 pm Sun. 10 am - 4 pm Pushmataha Co. Fairgrounds


AARP Safe Driving Course 9 am, CEC Antlers. To enroll, call 800-780-6486, ext. 248.


American Indian Youth Leadership Spring Powwow McCurtain Co. Fairgrounds


Dogwood Days Festival Idabel, 580-286-3305


Beavers Bend Kayak Classic Broken Bow Lake


Youth Tour Entries Due For details, contact Tonia Allred, 800-780-6486, ext. 217.


Hats Off To CEC Employees


Choctaw Electric held a special reception on January 7 honoring the following retiring employees for their many years of service. Standing: David Earl Young (43 years), Randy Watts (40 years), and Larry Alford (34 years). Sitting: Larry Cody (38 years) and Lois Ann Beason (25 years). Not pictured is Randy Mills (33 years).


Congratulations on your retirement, and thank you! 6 | february 2015


If hanging out with friends in a rock- rimmed canyon appeals to your eighth grader, encourage them to enter Choctaw Electric’s Energy Camp essay contest and they could win a trip to YouthPower Energy Camp. The camp on May 26 - 29 helps teens build confidence and leadership skills by learning about cooperative principles.


During camp, teens stay busy with games and activities that are both fun and educational. Energy campers organize their own coke and candy co-op, elect directors, distribute “sweet” patronage refunds in the form of Snickers bars, M&Ms and other treats, establish bylaws, and learn how and why co-ops differ from other businesses. During their stay, teens also learn about their electric co-op from the people who work there. Linemen give teens a pole climbing lesson complete with hard hat, spiked boots and a heavy tool belt. Safety


is emphasized at all times during Energy Camp, which helps educate teens about electrical dangers.


Swimming, canoing and other outdoor activities round out their stay. Campers also an enjoy a trip to Celebration Station in Oklahoma City.


CEC is offering this trip to three eighth


graders in CEC service territory. To enter, teens are asked to write a 250-300 word essay. Find complete contest details online www.choctawelectric.coop, or contact Brad Kendrick at 800-780-6486, ext. 248.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152