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PAGE 2 | FEBRUARY 2015


Lyle Mathis promoted to Operations VP L


yle Mathis, a long-time electric cooperative employee, recently


assumed his role as vice president of Operations at TCEC.


Mathis has more than 20 years of experience. He began his career as a groundman or ‘grunt’ at TCEC. He worked his way up to journeyman lineman then left to join Cookson Hills


Electric Cooperative in Stigler, where he worked his way up to construction foreman.


After nearly 13 years with Cookson Hills Electric, Mathis joined the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC) in Oklahoma City as safety and loss control instructor. After two years at OAEC, Mathis had the opportunity to rejoin TCEC as the cooperative’s manager of Maintenance. In November, he assumed the role of vice president of Operations at TCEC.


As the vice president of Operations, Mathis leads more than 50 employees who are responsible for the construction and maintenance of TCEC’s electric system. Tat’s a big job as TCEC’s service territory covers more than 5,400 square miles, including the Oklahoma Panhandle and parts of Kansas, Colorado, Texas and New Mexico. TCEC’s electric system has more than 5,400 miles of transmission and distribution lines and more than 50 substations.


Some of the areas Mathis will focus on in 2015 include: n Improve the member experience by mapping workflow processes to ensure members are kept informed.


n Evaluate and assess the system infrastructure to ensure continued safety and reliability of the system.


n Build a robust system operations group so that everyone is better informed when a power outage does occur.


Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month


Did you know that 90 percent of the energy used to operate a washing machine comes from using hot water? A simple switch from hot to cold can save a great deal of energy! Also, consider air drying or even line drying to save even more household energy.


Source: U.S. Department of Energy LYLE MATHIS DISCUSSES RESTORATION PLANS DURING AN OUTAGE.


“With this new opportunity, I plan to balance reliability and economics while never compromising safety to achieve either,” Mathis said. “We will continually improve the system’s reliability and safety for our members.


TCEC’s first priority is always safety and it is Lyle’s as well. Working on power lines safely means paying attention to detail and always ensuring one has taken the proper safety precautions.


“A couple of different electrical accidents affected friends of mine,” Mathis said. “Tat’s why safety is so important to me and I want to do everything I can to make sure our guys have the training and tools to do their job safely.”


Mathis and his family reside in Hooker. He and his wife, Susan, have three children. Toni, age 21, attends Oklahoma Panhandle State University. Grady, age 17, and Kylie, age 15, attend Hooker High School. n


Electrical Safety Tip of the Month Make sure


entertainment centers and computer equipment have plenty of space around them for ventilation.


Source: Electrical Safety Foundation International


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