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February 2015 Swatzell Joins SWRE Line Crew


Dustin Swatzell of Vernon recently joined Southwest Rural Electric as a journeyman lineman. Dustin will work with SWRE’s Texas crew that is based in Vernon. He is a graduate of Vernon High School and he holds a Bachelor of Science degree from West Texas A&M Univer- sity.


Dustin and his wife Sarah have one son, Sawyer. Dustin Swatzell


Keep Filters and Vents Clean Even if you’re waiting until spring to do a floor-to-ceiling cleanup around the house, three important cold- weather cleaning jobs can’t wait. First, clean your clothes dryer’s


vents. The lint and fluff that accumu- late in the vents don’t stop just because it’s cold outside. And you might not even have to venture outdoors for this task. Simply pull the dryer away from the wall, remove the back vent hose and vacuum it out. If it’s especially clogged, find a handy- man with a “snake” tool to help you out. A clogged dryer vent can start a


fire. And a clean one will help your clothes dryer use up to 25 percent less energy.


Next, do the same thing with the bathroom and kitchen vents. In the bathroom, remove the vent cover and


suction out whatever is in it. The stove vent is a bit trickier: It’s more likely to be clogged with grease than with lint and could need to be soaked and scrubbed. The effort is worth it, though, as it could prevent a grease fire. Finally, clean or replace your furnace filters at least every three months. Filters get clogged with airborne debris, like dust, dirt and even bugs. A dirty filter forces your furnace to work harder to keep your home comfortable. And the harder it works, the more energy it uses. Most filters are disposable, but if yours is not, rinse it with water and brush away the dirt. Avoid using chemical cleaners, as the furnace fan could push residual toxins on the filter into the indoor air you breath.


What’s Cookin’ in the SWRE Kitchen...


Joe Wynn, SWRE News editor Board of T


Dan White, Pres................. District 7


Don Ellis, Vice Pres. ...........District 1 D


2 (14.75 oz) cans salmon,


3/4 cup Italian-seasoned panko (Japanese bread cumbs)


1/2 cup minced fresh Parsley


2 eggs, beaten


2 green onions, chopped


2 tsp. seafood seasoning (such as Old Bay)


1-1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper 1-1/2 tsp. garlic powder 3 tbsp. Worchestershire


sauce


Parmesan cheese 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard 2 tbsp. mayonaise 1 tbsp. olive oil, or as needed, divided


Dan Lambert......................District 2 o n Proctor , Se c................Distric t 3


Ray Walker .........................District 4 Dan Elsener ........................District 5


Ronnie Swan ......................District 6 Carl Brockriede ..................District 8 Jimm y Holland,....... ...........Distric t 9


Association P.O. Box 310


1. Mix salmon, panko, parsley, eggs, green onions, seafood seasoning, black pepper, garlic powder, Worcestershire sauce, Parmesan cheese, Dijon Mustard and mayo together in a large bowl. Divide and shape into eight patties.


2. Heat enough olive oil in a large skillet to cover the cooking surface over medium heat. Fry the salmon patties in batches until browned, 5-7 minutes per side. Repeat with more olive oil as needed.


700 North Broadway


Tipton, OK 73570-0310 1-800-256-7973


is published monthly for distribution to members of Southwest Rural Electric Association.


Emergency Service


Payment Sites


Payments can be made at SWRE


700 North Br Tipton, OK 73570


Online payments can be made at www.swre.com


OR use the SWRE app


Payments may also be made at the following area banking institutions:


Altus – First National Bank, National Bank of Commerce


Blair – Peoples State Bank Crowell – State Bank Electra – Waggoner National Bank Frederick – BancFirst, First National Bank


Mt. Park – First National Bank Snyder – Bank of the Wichitas


Tipton – First National Bank Vernon – Herring Bank, Waggoner Bank, Bank of the West


NOTE: When paying at a bank site, allow 7-10 days prior to the bill due date.


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