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Celebrate Pizza in February


Pizza, introduced to America by Italian immigrants in the late 19th century, has become as American as another familiar pie. In fact, pizza is so popular we now have Na onal Pizza Day to celebrate on February 9, and what be er way than by making a couple of your own pies at home.


The founda on of all good pizza is a good crust. The 2-Ingredient Crust is delicious and doesn’t require any wait  me to rise. Make it and use it right away. And, for those that are gluten intolerant or just want to reduce their carb intake, the Caulifl ower Crust provides a tasty subs tute.


Finally, the White Pizza Sauce is rich and creamy. Cut back on your cheese a bit when using this to top your crust. 2-Ingredient Crust


1 cup plain Greek yogurt 1 1/2 cups self rising fl our


Work the ingredients together in a mixing bowl un l dough forms. Turn out onto a fl oured surface and kneed un l smooth. Roll or press into desired crust size. And place on pizza pan or baking sheet. Works well for thin or thick crusts.


Caulifl ower Crust One medium head raw caulifl ower 1 egg, beaten ⅓ cup so goat cheese 1 teaspoon dried oregano Pinch of salt


Trim fl orets from caulifl ower and pulse in a food processor un l a rice-like texture is achieved. This should make about 4 cups.


Fill a large pot with about an inch of water, and bring it to a boil. Add the caulifl ower and cover; let it cook for about 4-5 minutes. Drain into a fi ne-mesh strainer.


Once strained, transfer it to a clean, thin dishtowel. Wrap up the steamed caulifl ower in the dishtowel, twist it up, then squeeze out all the excess moisture.


In a large bowl, mix the strained caulifl ower, beaten egg, goat cheese, oregano, and salt. You want this very well combined.


Press the dough out onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Without the parchment, the dough will s ck. Press the dough about ⅓" thick. You can make the edges a li le higher if you like. Bake the crust for 35-40 minutes at 400 degrees F. The crust should be fi rm and golden brown.


Add your favorite toppings-- sauce, cheese, and any other toppings you like. Return the pizza to the oven and bake an addi onal 5-10 minutes un l the cheese is hot and bubbly.


February 2015 - 11


White Pizza Sauce 1/4 cup unsalted bu er 2 large shallots, minced very fi ne 4 cloves garlic, minced very fi ne 1 tablespoon all-purpose fl our 2 cups heavy cream, warm 1/2 teaspoon fresh thyme Salt and pepper


In a large skillet or saucepan, add bu er and shallot and cook over low heat un l shallots are transparent, about 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Add fl our and s r to distribute. Turn heat up to medium-low and cook for a minute. Slowly s r in warmed cream in a slow drizzle. S r or whisk constantly so lumps do not form. Bring to a very slight simmer and cook un l it thickens slightly and coats the back of a spoon. When sauce is the consistency of gravy, season with thyme and a pinch of salt and pepper.


Let sauce cool to room temperature before using or make it ahead of  me and keep in the refrigerator. Spread a thin layer on an unbaked crust and top with your favorite toppings. The pizza below is topped with mozzarella, fresh diced tomatoes and basil.


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