This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
HUMAN TRAFFICKING IN OKLAHOMA


By Laura Araujo A


n adolescent girl walks the streets in the red light district of a foreign metropolis. Entire families labor in grain fi elds for minimal wages, day after day, in order to repay insurmountable debts. A sweatshop of children, some as young as 5 years, are forced to manufacture clothing for 18 hours a day. This is an image of human traffi cking.


But, there’s another picture. Human traffi cking also happens in the United States. It takes place in big cities, along busy interstates, and in rural communities. Its victims are American citizens, frequently young people, of all races and social classes. “Does it happen in Oklahoma? Defi nitely,” said Jennifer Jones of Crisis Aid International, an organization that helps rescue and rehabilitate victims of human traffi cking, both in the U.S. and internationally. “It happens in pretty much every big city, but it also happens in small towns. There’s no place that’s free of it.” Human traffi cking, often called “modern-day slavery,” occurs when people are sold for commercial gain. Two of the most prominent markets are forced labor and sexual exploitation. A 2012 report by the U.S. Department of State said there are 20.9 million victims worldwide. Traffi ckers in this industry earn an estimated $32 billion annually, making it one of the most profitable criminal enterprises—second only to drug traffi cking. According to the U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI, 300,000 American youth are at risk of being traffi cked. The average age of sex traffi cking victims when they are fi rst sold is between 11 and 14 years.


SEE MORE!


If viewing our digital edition, click here to see powerful bonus content, including a video, song and helpful information. Access our digital edition at www.ok-living.coop or fi nd our FREE app at the Apple Newsstand, Google Play or Amazon.


MISCONCEPTIONS


Misconception: Human traffi cking is mainly a foreign issue.


Truth: Human traffi cking happens in the United States and many of the victims are Americans.


Misconception: Human traffi cking requires movement of people, often across state or national borders.


Truth: Human traffi cking sometimes involves movement of people—often to minimize traffi ckers’ risk of being apprehended—but not always. According to Crisis Aid International, half of all sex traffi cking victims are sold within their own communities.


20 WWW.OK-LIVING.COOP


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152