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February 2015


NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.


Page 3 No-cost tips to lower your energy bill


colder weather affects your energy use, what steps can you take to lower your bill? Here are some no-cost tips and tricks you can start using today: • Drape Delivery: Are you using your curtains to capture heat? Make sure drapes and shades are open to catch free solar heat during the day. Close them at night to keep the heat inside. • Thermostat: Set your thermostat to 68°F (or lower if comfortable). • Got tape? Though not as durable as foam, rubber, or vinyl, you can use non-porous tape (first aid cloth tape, for example) to keep cold air from squeezing into your home. Tape is good for blocking corners and irregu- lar cracks, and can be used at the top and bottom of a window sash; door frames; attic hatches; and inoperable windows. Reinforce with staples if needed. • Fan it up: Run ceiling paddle fans on low and reverse the rotation to blow


N


Hidden account number contest


Last month’s number went un-


claimed. They belonged to Steve Wheaton and Robert Fowler.


For those of you who aren’t familiar with the contest, this is how it works. We have hidden two account numbers somewhere in the articles in this newsletter. The numbers will always be enclosed in parentheses and will look similar to this example (XXXXXX).


If you recognize your account


number, all you have to do is give us a call on or before the 8th of the current month and we’ll give you a credit on your bill for the amount stated.


This month’s numbers are worth $75 each. Happy hunting!


12 chicken drumettes (1-1/2 lb.) 1/2 cup Kraft original barbecue sauce 1/4 cup Kraft classic Catalina dressing 1/4 cup apricot jam


Heat oven to 400°F.


Place chicken on foil-covered rimmed baking sheet sprayed with cooking spray. Bake 30 min. Meanwhile, mix remaining ingredients in medium bowl until blended.


Add chicken, a few drumettes at a time, to barbecue sauce mixture; toss to evenly coat. Return to prepared baking sheet.


Bake 15 min. or until chicken is done (165°F). Yield: 4 servings


ow that you’ve read the article on page one and have a bet- ter understanding of how the


air up in winter. This keeps warm air circulating without cooling you. • Free vents: Your HVAC system will have to work twice as hard if your air registers and vents are blocked by rugs, furniture, or drapes. Keep them clear to allow air to flow freely. • Garage Drain: Leave your garage door down. A warmer garage in win- ter will save energy. • Rug Relief: Have a spare rug? Use it to cover bare floors for added insulation. • Cool Food: Don’t make your fridge work too hard. Clean coils every year, and set the temperature between 34°-37° F; leave the freezer between 0°-5° F. Keep the freezer full—frozen food helps your freezer stay cool. When cooking keep lids on pots, and let hot food cool off before placing it in the refrigerator. • Hot Savings: Heating water ac- counts for 12 percent of your home’s energy use. Set your water heater temperature no higher than 120°F. For households with only one or two members, 115°F works.


In winter, set the thermostat to 68 degrees during the day (lower at night when you’re snug in bed). Each time you raise the temperature by one degree it raises your heating bill approximately one percent.


• Set up your account on our cus- tomer services portal or download our smartphone app. It’s free and a great way to keep track of your energy use! There are other ways to conserve


energy, too. Remember, you don’t pay for what you don’t use. When you’re not watching TV or using lights, com- puters, and other electronics, turn them off. Lower your room temperatures a bit and wear a sweater to stay warm, or place an extra blanket on the bed at night. Find more ways to save at www.TogetherWeSave.com.


Sweet & Saucy Chicken Drumettes


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