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Table Talk


CLICK’S STEAKHOUSE By Mitch Steichen


Locally cut and aged choice beef are elevated with Click’s secret blend of herbs and spices. Photo by Grant Leatherwood


“ W


here the West remains…” Pawnee, Okla.’s motto is also a great motto for its hometown treasure, Click’s Steakhouse. The restaurant’s décor would fi t right in over at the Pawnee Bill Ranch. Even its walls are pulled


straight from history. “The previous owner didn’t have a whole of money and couldn’t afford


much in the way of decoration,” Chad Bearden, owner of Click’s, said. “He went around, visiting farmers in the community, asking them if he could take what they had left over from torn down old barns. Much of what you see here in the dining area is reclaimed barn wood and corrugated tin.” The steakhouse’s history began in 1962, with its namesake, Clifton “Click”


Nelson. Click started the place as a private bar and grill called Click’s Alamo Club. He ran it for two decades until selling it to the Sanders family in 1982. Its name changed along the way and the Sanders family sold it to Roger Smith in 1995. It most recently changed hands in 2008 when Chad and Cindy Bearden took over. “Click’s has a long history with only a few owners, so we’re pretty proud of our tradition here,” Chad said. “It has grown tremendously. We’re happy we’ve been able to maintain and build upon the success that Click’s has always had.” Although Chad says he never had the pleasure of meeting Click, stories fl oat around Pawnee that he was quite the ornery fellow. A story on the Click’s menu tells of a time when the founder received an order in the kitchen for a customer who wanted fries with their steak. His colorful response was loud enough to be heard through the dining area as he not so politely suggested that the cus- tomer go across the street to the Tastee-Freez for their fries. The service is a


YA’LL COME EAT!


Specialties: Steak, prime rib, fried pick- les and mushrooms, baked potatoes, and Mile-High Meringue and Tollhouse Pies


Prices: Steaks go from $16 for a 12-ounce KC Strip to $22 for a 24-ounce Porterhouse. Sides range from $1.50 to $4. Slices of pie are $4 with a scoop of ice cream for only 75 cents more.


Hours: Open Tuesday – Thursday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Closed on Monday. Reservations for din- ner on the weekends are recommended.


Address: 409 Harrison St., Pawnee, Okla., on the downtown square, at the intersec- tion of highway 64 and highway 18.


Website: www.clickssteakhouse.com WATCH!


If viewing our digital edition, click here to get behind the grill with owner Chad Bearden. Access our digital edition at www.ok-living.coop or fi nd our FREE app at the Apple Newsstand, Google Play or Amazon.


little more courteous these days. “I won’t yell at you if you order french fries,” Chad said. What really brings people to Click’s is, of course, the steak. The cooks start with a good-quality steak from the local butcher who cuts and ages only choice beef. Next, they add a secret blend of herbs and spices that has been used on their steaks for over 50 years. Both the seasoning and the steak’s natural fl avor are sealed in by the kitchen’s fl at top grill. The result is a juicy, fl avorful steak, cooked to order. “The key is starting with a quality product and our seasoning and preparation takes care of the rest,” Chad said. “My personal favorite is the prime rib.” Besides steaks, Click’s offers a full range of dining options, from salmon to


chicken fried steak to shrimp. Side dishes include loaded baked potatoes, okra, fries (sorry Click), corn on the cob and all dinners come with a trip through the salad bar. Finish it off with a slice of Click’s famous Mile-High Meringue or Tollhouse Pie, with a scoop of ice cream on the side. Whatever you choose, you really can’t choose wrong—and it’s all brought to your table with a smile. “We want our customers to get the kind of experience they won’t fi nd at a cookie cutter, chain restaurant,” Chad said. “Kelly, our front manager, does a great job welcoming our customers and training our staff to provide the best service possible. I think there is a charm here that you won’t fi nd anywhere else.” Click’s tradition goes beyond its food, doing their part as a service to the community of Pawnee as well. The restaurant takes part in fundraisers and will provide free catering when they can.


“It’s important to the community and to us that we support one another,”


Chad said. “We can provide revenue and jobs for those here in Pawnee, and we’ve seen a lot of community support in how many regulars we have.” So if there is another reason to visit Click’s besides the world-class steaks it would defi nitely be for the scenic drive to Pawnee, the Old West atmosphere, and the staff’s genuine, friendly service.


FEBRUARY 2015 15


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