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co-op values Revolving Loan Fund To Continue Under CKenergy


Co-op sponsored REDL&G program helps western Oklahoma create more jobs—and keep them.


W


hether its CKenergy Cooperative or Kiwash Electric,


electric co-ops have an obligation to their members that goes beyond simply selling electricity. Beginning with its founding fathers in late 1930s, Kiwash Electric fostered a strong sense of community that is carried on today through programs such as the Rural Economic Development Loan and Grant (REDL&G) program. This program will continue as


part of CKenergy services.


Created in 1997, the Kiwash Electric REDL&G program makes loans available to startup businesses and existing businesses in order to create new jobs for western Oklahoma. Working with municipalities, industries, and business leaders, the Kiwash REDL&G program has created over 120 jobs in the six-county region. “These loans diversified our job base and improved the overall economy of west-central Oklahoma,” said Dennis Krueger, Kiwash


general manager. “Projects funded by this revolving loan fund built vital infrastructure, improved factories, helped new businesses to open, and renovated several existing businesses.”


The program works via a revolving loan fund created by the co-op for the purpose of economic development. Local funds are then matched by federal grant funds from USDA Rural Development to create the unique re-lending program known REDL&G.


CKenergy Cooperative will continue to lend to existing or start-up businesses and industries in western Oklahoma. New jobs or job retention will continue to determine loan eligibility. Krueger explained that mortgage rights for land, building and/or permanent equipment must be incorporated within the loan application. Interest rates


Kiwash Electric’s revolving loan fund helped build the community swimming pool and recreation center in Burns Flat. PHOTO/TOM SPENCE.


are based on New York prime lending rates and loan terms are determined by collateral.


“This program was established to complement the lending abilities of local banks and


provide a competitive advantage for local companies,” Krueger said.”We work together with local bankers and business leaders to find the best financing solution. This revolving loan fund is just one of the ways we keep our communities sustainable and it will remain active under the CKenergy banner.”


Additional information and loan applications are found at www.kiwash.coop under the Economic Development section.


Sugar Coated Pecans INGREDIENTS


1 egg white 1 tablespoon water 1 pound pecan halves 1 cup white sugar 3⁄4 teaspoon salt


1⁄2 teaspoon ground cinnamon


Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month


Remember to close your fireplace damper (unless a fire is burning). Keeping the damper open is like leaving a window wide open during the winter, allowing warm air to escape through the chimney.


Source: Energy.gov


DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 250°F. Grease one baking sheet.


In a mixing bowl, whip together the egg white and water until frothy. In a separate bowl, mix together sugar, salt, and cinnamon.


Add pecans to egg whites, stir to coat the nuts evenly. Remove the nuts, and toss them in the sugar mixture until coated. Spread the nuts out on the prepared baking sheet.


Bake at 250° F. for 1 hour. Stir every 15 minutes. SOURCE: ALLRECIPES.COM


Kilowatt | DECEMBER 2015 | 3


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