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Northfork Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Operating in


Beckham, Roger Mills, Washita, Greer, Custer, Harmon, and Dewey


SCOTT COPELAND GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Jimmy Taylor-Pres ............................. Elk City Charles Hickey-V. Pres .....................Reydon Ransom Snowden-Sec-Treas ...........Erick Chris Mackey ....................................... Sayre Larry Smith ..................................Cheyenne Lloyd Joe Patton ............................... Sayre Danny Davis .....................................Elk City Brendon Atkinson........................Attorney


SAYRE OFFICE


Kenny Waugh ................Mgr. of Marketing Lisa Dailey................Mgr. of Office Services Jeff Mohr ................Mgr. of Acct. & Finance Kay Brown ............................Adm. Assistant Richard Bowdre ............... Operations Mgr. Heath Martin...........................Safety Director


REYDON OFFICE Barbara Swope ..........................655-4557


FOR OUTAGES AFTER 5 P.M. CALL 1-800-NO-VOLTS (1-800-668-6587) or


(580) 928-3366


OFFICE HOURS 8 AM TO 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY


DATES TO REMEMBER READINGS MUST BE IN NORTHFORK OFFICE BY THE 10th


TO BE USED FOR BILLING ADDRESS


P.O. Box 400


SAYRE, OK 73662 301 E. MAIN


Kay Rabbitt-Brower.......Editor OF EACH MONTH


Respond Safely to an Electrical Accident


By Heath Martin NFEC Safety Director


Imagine driving down the road, and you come upon a car accident. Utility poles are down, and power lines have fallen. Would you know what to do? Knowing how to respond in this kind of scenario could save your life - as well as someone else’s. Your training and impulse may be to render help as quickly as you can, but when electricity is involved, the wrong action could hurt or even kill you and others at the scene. Traffic accidents, high winds, ice storms, and other events can bring down power lines within range of pedestri- ans and vehicles. Electricity can be an unforeseen hazard, particularly when overhead power lines have fallen and made contact with vehicles, the ground, or anything that conducts electricity. The wire may not be sparking or making signs that it is live, but it may be sending deadly voltage into whatever it is in contact with. Therefore, always assume the power line is energized, and never touch or approach it. If responding to an accident scene involving a vehicle and downed lines, stay back and warn others to stay away. Make sure the occupants of the car stay inside until the utility has arrived to de- energize the lines.


This institution is an equal oppor- tunity provider and employer.


In a rare circumstance, the vehicle may catch fire. The only way the occu- pants can safely exit is to jump free and clear without touching the vehicle and ground at the same time. Advise them to jump and land with feet together, and then hop away to safety. However, an accident involving a fallen power line is not the only situa- tion where electricity can be involved.


Electrical accidents can happen in your home or in your yard.


If someone has been in contact with


electricity, there are not always obvi- ous injuries. These are the symptoms to look for: changes in alertness, head- ache, problems with vision, swallowing or hearing, irregular heartbeat, muscle spasm and pain, numbness or tingling, and breathing problems.


If you come upon someone who


may have suffered an electrical shock, do not touch the person. He or she may still be in contact with the source and may be energized. If there is water involved, do not get in the water. Make sure to call 911 and the electric utility immediately.


If it can be done safely, turn off the electricity at the source (the circuit breaker or breaker box). Otherwise, wait for the help of emergency responders. Once the source of electricity is off, then it is okay to check for vital signs. However, do not move a person with an electrical injury unless he or she is in immediate danger.


Anyone who has come into contact with electricity should see a doctor to check for internal injuries even if there are no obvious signs or symptoms. When it comes to accidents, looking out for electrical hazards until an electric utility crew cuts off the power is vitally important for professional first respond- ers as well as bystanders who come upon the scene of an accident. For more information on stay- ing safe around electricity, visit Safe- Electricity.org, or feel free to call me, NFEC’s Safety Director, at 580-928- 3366.


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