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WARNING: That big buck could cost you big bucks.


by stray bullets. While some of the damage is a result of vandalism, oftentimes the problem results from a hunter with a bad case of buck fever. As a member- owned, not-for-profit electric cooperative, the cost to repair damage is shared by all KEC members.


T


housands of Kiamichi Electric Cooperative (KEC) member’s dollars are spent every year repairing equipment and power lines that are struck


If your trophy deer is too near the power line, please don’t shoot.


This cost doesn’t include the inconvenience and hazards to members down the line who may require power for medical equipment or other needs. Meanwhile, KEC linemen must do some hunting of their own as they span miles of line trying to locate the problem.


If you are a hunter or a gun-owner, please don’t shoot near or toward power lines, power poles, or substations. A stray bullet can cause damage to equipment, could be deadly to the shooter, and could potentially interrupt electric service to large areas. In some cases, this damage isn’t noticed for several weeks or months and is only discovered when an unexplained outage occurs.


Landowners, too, are encouraged to take note of others who may be hunting on their property and remind them to be aware of power lines.


Together, we can ensure reliable service at reasonable costs. Your cooperation is appreciated!


Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month


Remember to close your fireplace damper (unless a fire is burning). Keeping the damper open is like leaving a window wide open during the winter, allowing warm air to escape through the chimney.


Source: Energy.gov


Tips for Hunters


• Do not shoot at or near power lines or insulators.


• Familiarize yourself with the location of power lines and equipment on land where you shoot.


• Damage to the conductor can happen, possibly dropping a phase on the ground. If it’s dry and the electricity goes to ground, there is the possibility of electrocution and wildfire.


• Be especially careful in wooded areas where power lines may not be as visible.


• Do not use power line wood poles or towers to support hunting equipment.


• Take notice of warning signs and keep clear of electrical equipment.


• Do not place deer stands on utility poles or climb poles. Energized lines and equipment on the poles can conduct electricity to anyone who comes in contact with them, causing shock or electrocution.


• Do not shoot at, or near, birds perching on utility lines. That goes for any type of firearm, including pistols, rifles or shotguns.


• Do not place decoys on power lines or other utility equipment. Anything attached to a pole besides utility equipment can pose an obstruction - and a serious hazard.


If you notice an unsafe electrical situation, please contact your co- op immediately at 800-888-2731.


Light Post | november - december 2015 | 5


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