This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Prairie Flavors


Prairie Flavors


Content! By Laura Araujo


Creating Christmas Memories


Grandma Anne’s Cottage


Potatoes Serves 12


✓ 10 large potatoes ✓ ½ pound cheddar cheese ✓ 1 large onion, chopped ✓ ½ green bell pepper, chopped ✓ ½ red bell pepper, chopped ✓ 1 slice bread, chopped ✓ ¼ cup milk ✓ ¾ cup butter, melted


Place the potatoes in a large pot. Boil them in their skins until they are tender; drain. Once the potatoes are cool, remove the skins and cut them into 1-inch cubes. Cut the cheese into ¼-inch cubes. Combine the potatoes, cheese, chopped vegetables and bread in a large bowl and mix gently. Transfer to a 9-by-13 baking pan. Pour the milk and butter over top. Bake for 40 min- utes in a 350°F oven.


Witch-Hat Cupcakes Photos by Laura Araujo


If you come from a family that likes to cook, like mine, creating a family cookbook can be a great gift that family members will treasure for generations. Here are some suggested steps for creating one. If you have any questions about creating a cookbook, feel free to contact me at laurakc81@hotmail.com.


1) Start by deciding on a vision for your cookbook. If you don’t have a lot of time to invest, keep your vision simple. For example, you could collect one favorite recipe from each family member and publish the cookbook electronically or print it yourself.


2) Decide on a timeline. Work backward from your goal “release” date and decide how long each of the steps below will take. Create a calendar to keep you on track.


3) Decide whom to include in the cookbook. What side(s) of the family? Which generations? Friends? Make a list.


4) Gather the recipes. Send an email (or letter) to each person you are inviting to contribute. You could also use a social media group to collect recipes. Make sure to specify all the pertinent information you need from contribu- tors. Gather additional recipes from family cookbooks or recipe boxes and type them.


5) Edit recipes. Copy the recipes into a word processor document. Proofread for mistakes. Make sure they are formatted in a uniform manner.


6) Organize recipes within your word processor document, in an order that makes sense. For example, if you receive mostly desserts,


Savory Pumpkin Dip


you may want to have separate chapters for cookies, cakes, pies, etc.


Grandma Anne’s Cottage Potatoes Photo by Laura Araujo


CREATE A FAMILY COOKBOOK!


7) Design the cookbook. You can do this in a simple word processor; however, if you have software like Microsoft Publisher, Adobe Inde- sign or Pages for Mac, this will make your job easier. You may want to include some artwork.


8) Prepare additional elements you may want to include: a cover photo or design, introduc- tory words, a family tree, a table of contents, etc.


9) Review the cookbook. Take time to review the cookbook for typos, formatting issues, etc. It would be good to have a few sets of eyes to do this. Make the changes.


10) Create an index (optional). First, go through the recipes and type a list of the major ingre- dients. (Don’t include ingredients like butter or fl our that would be used in many recipes or ingredients that play a minor part in a recipe.) Under each ingredient, list the titles of all the recipes that include that ingredient and the page number where each recipe can be found. (A single recipe can be listed under more than one ingredient.) Look at other cookbooks for examples. Note: Don’t create the index until your cookbook is almost fi nalized.


11) Review one last time.


12) Publish the cookbook. A few publishing op- tions include: 1) Self-publish through a profes- sional publisher. Examples include tastebook. com, heritagecookbook.com, blurb.com, lulu. com, etc. 2) Print the cookbook yourself or through a local printer. 3) The easiest way to publish would be to create an e-book that can be viewed on a computer, tablet or mobile device—plus you can do this for free!


BonusBonus


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