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MACHINING: TOP VALUE-ADDED SERVICE


76.5% of facilities with value-added operations) off ering fi nish machining capabilities and 892 off ering rough machining (53.4%; 75.1%). Heat treatment, patternmaking and engi- neering and design all totaled more than 700 responses. T e vast majority of facilities


off ering value-added services reported multiple methods, with 1,105 of 1,188 (93.3%) off ering at least two. Fifty-fi ve metalcasters reported off ering all 10 of the survey’s value-added services. Prototyping (290) and coating (217) were the least popular services.


Coremaking Methods


Leader: Shell Last Place: Cast-in Inserts A little more than half of the


participating facilities (893) reported using some method of coremaking. Shell and air-set/nobake coremaking were the top two responses, with 609 and 571 facilities reportedly using the methods, respectively. T e least popu- lar methods were ceramic cores (99 facilities) and cast-in inserts (40). Nearly 80% of responding facilities


use more than one method for core- making, with 182 locations using just a single method. T e combination of shell and air-set/nobake was the most common tandem, with 416 facilities reportedly using both methods, while 340 responses included both shell and green sand methods.


47.3%


Aluminum is the dominant material, with 800 facilities (47.3% of


respondents) pouring some type of aluminum alloy.


The shell coremaking process remains the most popular method, edging out air-set/nobake by 2%. Total Number of U.S. Plants


January 2015 MODERN CASTING | 27


Total Number of U.S. Plants Of the 1,692 participating facilities, 1,188 reported offering at least one value-added service.


SHELL COREMAKING: TOP PROCESS


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