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State of The Union


Modern Casting breaks down the U.S. metalcasting industry by material, process and state. A MODERN CASTING STAFF REPORT


Modern Casting offers a snapshot of the American metalcasting indus- try. The data was compiled from a survey of 1,692 domestic metalcast- ing facilities, 86.1% of the estimated total of 1,965 plants. Following is a breakdown of


M Material


Leader: Aluminum Last Place: Titanium Aluminum is the dominant


material, with 800 facilities (47.3% of respondents) pouring some type of aluminum alloy. The percentage of aluminum casting facilities is a slight increase from last year’s 46.6% (788 of 1,691 respondents). While most facilities report pouring more than one material, no other metal comes close to aluminum’s share. However, when it comes to volume, aluminum comes in third after duc- tile and gray iron. Iron is the second most used


the survey results, illustrating the numbers by material, process, location, value-added services and coremaking capabilities. The percent of responses reflects the number of surveyed facilities that responded to each question. Averages were found by eliminating the highest and low- est numbers in each category and dividing the sum by the number of responses.


ining data from a survey of metalcast- ing facilities across the United States,


material, with 25.5% of metalcast- ing facilities pouring the metal, a decrease of more than 4% in the last year. Sixty-two facilities (3.7%) reported pouring aluminum, iron and steel, and 118 facilities (7%) pour


both aluminum and iron. Titanium remains in last place, with only 21 facilities casting it.


Plants Per State Leader: Ohio


ALUMINUM REMAINS TOP MATERIAL


Total Number of U.S. Plants


Aluminum and copper-base alloys increased their totals by 12 and nine plants, respectively, compared to 2013.


January 2015 MODERN CASTING | 25


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