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INDUSTRY FACES


ourselves and recruiting fu- ture employees,” Rittmeyer said. “Hoosier Pattern has now taken an active role in promoting ourselves to the local high schools and our prospective employees to show them the opportuni- ties that are offered to them if they take a career path with us.” In addition to the com-


munity outreach, Rittmeyer is involved with Hoosier’s apprenticeship program, of which he was the first graduate a decade and a half ago. Te 10,000-hour, 36-credit hour program allows students to rotate through all phases of the pattern shop. An apprentice will cycle through the machin- ing area, benching and rigging department, quality control/ assurance and programming and design. Te goal is to produce a fully capable, well-rounded in-


dividual. Hoosier has four apprentices at a time, ensuring each receives proper training and instruction. Addition- ally, three potential apprentices are on the wait list. Te


Rittmeyer helped found a community outreach program.


industry has a long way to go in marketing itself to the next generation of skilled workers, but Rittmeyer’s experience, both as an apprentice and now as a mentor, shows that metalcasting can attract talent. “Manufacturing isn’t a dirty,


grimy job that nobody wants,” Rittmeyer said. “It’s highly skilled with lots of technology, like 3-D printing, CNC equip- ment and CAD. It’s cool stuff. We’re telling these high school


kids that manufacturing in America is alive, it’s well, and it’s a great opportunity. We want to get the brightest. We want the best running a CNC mill or programming a sand printer that’s going to produce $14,000 of scrap in a single night if programmed improperly.”


ONLINE RESOURCE: Scan the QR code or visit http://bit.ly/1taOMEV for the full interview between Dave Rittmeyer and metalcasting marketing expert Mark Mehling.


http://bit.ly/1zeEk6g


January 2015 MODERN CASTING | 15


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