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show review | 2016 Right: Rapid’s


first own-man- ufactured shredder


targets plastic size reduction needs


1,000 kg/h; PA/glass lines up to 500 Kg/h. The company can also provide systems for production of carbon fibre and carbon/glass fibre hybrid reinforced products. Littwitz said the key advantage of the Protec offering


– aside from its one-stop shop approach – is the very high level of impregnation it achieves. This is important as it has an impact on surface quality in the final injection moulded parts. “The die is part of this but the main issue is the spreading of the fibre . This is not just due to the the tooling but the whole process,” she said. LFT production lines can be trialled at ProTec’s plant at Bensheim in Germany, where they can be configured with a wide range of drying and dosing equipment. The company showed new additions to its Somos Batchmix gravimetric dosing and RDT and RDM dryer ranges at the show. ❙ www.sp-protec.com


Sweden’s Rapid unveiled its Raptor at the show – the company’s first in-house manufactured shredder. “Shredders are generally designed for the wood or general waste industry,” said CEO and Sales and Marketing Director Bengt Rimark. “What we have done is developed a shredder that is 100% focused on plastics.” A key feature of the Raptor design is the ease of


Below: X-Rite’s Ci7860 spectropho- tometer has improved inter- instrument agreement


cleaning, which is achieved through the integration of the company’s “open hearted” machine features. It also uses a scissor-cut action with easily replaceable cutting knives each with four cutting blades and a sacrificial fixing system that minimises the risk of rotor damage. “It will happen that metal will be fed in. The first time that happens that sacrificial washer will save a lot of money,” said Rimark. The Raptor shredder can be used as a standalone


unit or integrated into a combined shredder and granulation system, such as the company’s Duo Concept.


Rapid, which until early last year was owned by US-based IPEG, is in the process of opening a produc- tion plant in Pennsylvania in the US. Rimark said the 6,000m2


facility will mostly assemble and adapt


equipment for local supply and is a major investment for the company in an important market. “The US is such an important market for us so we need to deliver with the same leadtimes as we do out of our Swedish operation,” he said. Production will be ramped up at the new location during 2017. ❙ www.rapidgranulator.se


X-Rite Pantone used K 2016 to present its vision of the future in colour control for the plastics industry, showcasing its developments for design, formulation, production and quality control. Antoine Preisig, the company’s new General Manager for EMEA, highlighted the ability of X-Rite Pantone’s new Total Appearance Capture (TAC) technology to scan and communicate “not only colour, but the overall appearance of materials”. The technology enables designers, material


specifiers and marketers to bring product designs to life with digital materials that have the same visual characteristics as their physical counterparts. TAC captures physically accurate material measurements and appearance properties, reducing the need for manual adjustments to scanned materials, and improving design and approval cycles. X-Rite was also showing its latest Ci7860 benchtop


spectrophotometer, which has been developed to minimise the contribution of inter-instrument agree- ment to colour variation. It has an inter-instrument agreement specification of 0.06 average Delta E*, which represents a 25% improvement over other sphere spectrophotometers, says the company. ❙ www.xrite.com


84 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016 www.compoundingworld.com


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