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waiting since then for the European Commission to add the monomer to the EU 10/2011 permitted list, the final step in the approval process that took place in September. “We really underestimated the time it would take to


get approval,” he said. “Now we will be increasing our efforts in marketing. We are not under the impression that we will sell thousands of tonnes overnight but we are in contact with a number of users.” Akestra can be used in hot and cold food contact


Above: MDI’s ECOBlack masterbatch is made from recycled carbon black


Metallic Silver, Metallic Gold, Metallic Copper and Metallic Red. The company also showed examples from its WAY series of high UV stability pigments, its latest functional pigments for applications such as Laser Direct Structuring and laser marking, plus the IM3D decoration technology that it is jointly marketing with PolyOne. ❙ www.merckgroup.com


Modern Dispersions Inc (MDI) used K 2016 to introduce its new ECOBlack masterbatches that have 100% recycled content. The carbon black comes from post- consumer tyres, while the carrier material is recycled polyethylene. The reclaimed materials are sourced to deliver consistent high quality, according to MDI. The masterbatch costs 5-10% less than standard


grades, and it is aimed at price-sensitive commodity applications such as trash bags or flower pots, explains Rene Collin, Strategic Accounts Manager at MDI. The company also used K 2016 to introduce three


new blue-tone carbon black masterbatches for automo- tive interior applications, such as door panels and instrument panels. They have been optimised to provide good aesthetics and avoid the brown tones that can be created by standard products. MDI says that modern automotive interiors demand higher jetness along with different undertones from a pigment masterbatch to match the overall interior scheme. The new blue-tone masterbatches can be used in PE, PP and TPOs, including soft touch materials. ❙ www.moderndispersions.com


Right: Buss


unveiled a new version of its MX105


compounding extruder


Perstorp said its Akestra thermoplastic copolyester, developed with Mitsubishi Gas Chemical, has finally gained EU food contact approval. Akestra Product Manager David


Engberg said the company commenced the approval process back in 2012 and secured a positive recommendation for the base PESG monomer used in the resin from EFSA in 2014. It has been


78 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016 www.compoundingworld.com


applications. The transparent resin offers a Tg of up to 110°C and a deflection temperature under load up to 30°C above standard PET, making it suitable for use as a higher performance alternative to PET in thin wall packaging or for PC in durable applications. It can also be used as a performance enhancer for recycled PET. Pricing is around €3.50 per kg. Potential applications for Akestra overlap with


Eastman’s Tritan copolyester but Engberg said it is not an equivalent; key differences cited include higher rigidity and gloss. Like the Eastman resin, however, Akestra is free of bisphenol-A (BPA); Engberg said that aspect will not feature in the company’s marketing. Akestra monomer and polymer is manufactured in Japan by Mitsubishi Gas Chemical at a 2,000 tonne/year capacity plant using Perstorp feedstocks. Engberg said the long term plan is to take production to Europe but that no decision on that had yet been made. ❙ www.perstorp.com


Machinery and equipment Buss updated its MX 105 compounding line for process- ing of highly filled or crosslinkable halogen-free flame retardant (HFFR) cable compounds at throughputs of up to 1,500 kg/h.


The MX 105 is the mid-range model in the MX series.


It is available with a processing length of 15 or 22 L/D and can be fitted with two or three feed hoppers. The new version includes a revised reduction/stroke gearbox that offers greater efficiency together with lower noise. The hinged process section now opens to 120°, wider than previous versions to provide better access for cleaning and maintenance.


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