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machinery | Laboratory compounders


Right: The CPeX from


Farrel Pomini is a scaled-


down version of its production continuous


mixer equip- ment


flex-wall volumetric feeder and it can accept full-size pellets as well as other materials. Both the feeder and the mixer are preconfigured with integrated wiring and piping for “connect and go” operation, says the company. The PLC-based control system and touch- screen HMI are designed to be easy to use. A supervi- sory control and data acquisition (SCADA) function, which enhances analysis and recipe building, is included in the laboratory machine - it is an option on production-scale machines. The CPeX system will be available for worldwide shipment in late Q1 2017. North American customers will be able to see the machine at Farrel Pomini’s recently completed new US headquarter facility at Ansonia, Connecticut. The purpose-built facility is located a few miles from the company’s previous headquarters, which had been its home for more than 100 years. “Moving to a new facility has allowed the study and re-working of our machine assembly areas and processes, which can now be configured exactly in line with the requirements of building the Continuous Mixer and Compact Processor products. For instance, the assembly floor has been designed to minimise movements and streamline testing of machines, a major inefficiency in our previous machine assembly,” says Lloyd. The facility also houses customer demon- stration and R&D facilities.


Below: KraussMaffei Berstorff says its new ZE 28 BluePower lab compounder is designed for flexible small batch operation


Designed for R&D KraussMaffei Berstorff introduced its ZE 28 BluePower laboratory extruder at K2016. Using the same design as the larger machines in the ZE BluePower series, the 28mm twin-screw extruder has a diameter ratio (Do/Di) of 1.65 for a large free volume, and includes 4D and 6D housing elements and pressed-in liners for wear protection. The laboratory extruder is designed for speed, productivity and efficiency in R&D applications, as well as expanding the process window for small- batch production compared to the company’s existing UTX laboratory extruder.


With its 28mm diameter screws and motor/gear


combination rated for high torque density, the new extruder’s output rate can be increased by up to 43% with torque-limited processes and up to 70% for volume-limited processes compared to the company’s earlier 25mm laboratory TSE. The ZE 28 offers a screw speed of up to 1,200 rpm and is designed for output rates between 20 and 200 kg/h. A process running on the ZE 28 can be easily scaled up to a larger-scale ZE BluePower TSE, says the company. “The new machine is of particular interest to


compounding operations that are increasingly confronted with ever-greater product variety accompanied by ever-smaller batches,” says Peter Roos, President of the Extrusion Technology Segment and the KraussMaffei Berstorff brand. Roos says that the new machine’s features meet the market need for overall equipment efficiency, including energy efficiency, cost-effectiveness, equipment availability, performance and product quality. The new laboratory extruder features a twin-screw


side unit for lateral degassing (ZSA-E) that enhances reliability, particularly with tacky and tough compounds that tend to rise in a vertical degassing dome. A twin-screw side feeder (ZSA-D) uses the UltraFeed design for feeding high filler levels. The UltraGlide feature allows the filled screws and the drive block to be removed backwards from the stationary processing section for rapid inspection of the process and for replacing screw elements without the need to disas- semble the downstream equipment. The new BPC Touch control panel has a clear menu


structure to guide the machine operator through the process steps. It includes several security aspects. Each operator is required to log in at the integrated tran- sponders by RFID chip card to access assigned functions and the control system completely records all steps performed by the operator. The BPC Touch


54 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016 www.compoundingworld.com


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