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additives | Flame retardants


hygiene by reduced dust formation,” an Adeka spokes- man says. “ADK STAB FP-2500S is being introduced to the market to meet these demands. The initial feedback from customers is positive.” Dow Corning says its latest 40-001 liquid additive


offers silicone-based flame retardance for low-MFI transparent polycarbonates. It enables high clarity, maintains tensile strength and modulus and meets UL94 V-0 fire performance at 1.5mm or 1.0mm when used with synergists. Applications include consumer electronics, LED lighting, automotive lighting lenses and exterior lighting, as well as sheet extrusion. Silicone based HFFR technologies provide a low rate


Above: Flame retardant stadium seats in PP


intumescents are promoted as an alternative to ammonium polyphosphate and are said to generate almost no black smoke and acidic gases during combustion. Other claimed benefits include higher heat stability and maintenance of physical properties. Adeka cites a number of successful applications in wire and cable and E&E housing applications made in polyole- fins, adding that “with many on-going projects, the range of applications is expected to continue to expand.” The latest addition to the series is ADK STAB FP-2500S. This is an easier-to-handle version of the high performance ADK STAB FP-2200S grade. “Al- though dispersion is key, improved flowability was a request from the market in order to improve industrial


of heat release and toxic gas evolution and a high level of smoke suppression while maintaining a compound’s mechanical properties, Dow Corning says. As a synergist in highly filled systems, the additives enhance the performance of both ATH and MDH, helping formulators to reduce the negative effect of FR filler loading on mechanical performance.


Mineral flame retardants Huber Corp’s acquisition of the Albemarle Martinswerk business earlier this year has further enhanced its position in mineral-based flame retardants (ATH and MDH). Huber Sales Manager Mitch Halpert says the deal has worked well; Huber already had a strong position in the market in North America with four plants while Albemarle was strong in Europe and Asia via its Martinswerk plants in Austria (a joint venture with


Clariant broadens Chinese HFFR collaboration


At K 2016, Clariant said it would broaden its collaboration with the Engineering Plastics division of Taiwan-based Shinkong Synthetic Fibers Corp to promote Clariant’s Exolit OP aluminium diethyl phosphinate flame retardants for applications in China. Shinkong Engineering Plastics – a


part of Taiwan’s third largest enterprise, Shinkong Group - is an important supplier of PBT polymer and compounds. It says its halogen-free compounds based on Clariant’s flame retardants are experiencing rising demand from Chinese E&E producers seeking to comply with tightening environmental regulations. Clariant introduced Exolit OP 1240 to Shinkong 13 years ago for use in PBT


28 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016


Clariant Exolit OP flame retardants are increasingly used in electrical products


compounds, which the company commer- cialised in 2005. Shinkong was the first company in the Greater China region to promote halogen-free PBT compounds, says Jan Sültemeyer, Head of Global Product Management for Additives and Innovation at Clariant. The company,


which has plants both in Taiwan and in mainland China (Hangzhou) is already exporting compounds to Europe and aims to increase business as the trend to electric vehicles picks up. Clariant says Exolit OP phosphinate


flame retardants offer high thermal stability and best in class CTI (Compara- tive Tracking Index) performance. It offers grades for polyamides and epoxies, as well as thermoplastic polyesters. Clariant says that, in addition to their


joint promotion efforts on PBT and PA compounds, the two companies may extend their collaboration to include TPE-E compounds for wire and cable and injection moulding. ❙ www.clariant.comwww.shinkong.com.tw


www.compoundingworld.com


PHOTO: ITALMATCH


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