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machinery | Laboratory compounders


parameters obtained with The Process 11 are directly scalable to the company’s larger-scale extruders, such as the Thermo Scientific EuroLab 16 and Thermo Scientific TSE MC 24. At K 2016, the company introduced an optional sheet die and chilled sheet take-off for the Process 11. The sheet die provides a 30mm width with a flexible lip height (maximum of 3 mm) and external heating up to 350°C. The chilled sheet take-off has an interchange- able two or three-roll setup and includes a self-adjust- ing wind-off for diameter compensation.


The Process 11 benchtop compounding extruder from ThermoFisher handles throughputs to 2.5 kg/h


standalone operation using a tablet computer, while a new app is available for Apple iOS or Android devices that monitors relevant process parameters such as torque, pressure, temperature and screw speed. The Micro-Compounder is typically used for


compounding expensive or small-scale materials. It is designed to record rheological properties , such as rela- tive viscosity, to allow measurement of structural changes during compounding. A pneumatic force-feed- er allows easy sample loading, and an integrated bypass valve allows the sample to be recirculated in a slit-capillary backflow channel for a defined time period. A hinged barrel and fast cooling capacity allow the user to “freeze” the compound and open the barrel for further examination. The compact system can be placed in a fume hood if needed to limit exposure to hazardous materials.


Scalable processing Thermo Scientific also offers the Process 11 Bench-top Extruder for compounding applications in the range 20 g/h to 2.5 kg/h. This machine has touch-screen control, integrated feeder control, and a clamshell barrel design with a removable top half for easy cleaning. The process


Putting plant to the test Many extruder manufacturers operate plant lines where customers and prospective customers can run trials to test their materials on an extruder set-up. At the Buss lab in Switzerland, for example, customers can run trials on the Buss MX-30 laboratory extruder or larger lines to test new recipes or to gain familiarity with the Buss Kneader. “Customers may want to enter new markets with new materials, and they are sometimes familiar with twin-screws but not our kneader technol- ogy,” says Edgar von Gelhorn, Head of Process at Buss. Running a trial is a good way to exchange processing


knowledge and is a training opportunity, says von Gelhorn. Experiments can include changing the process, compounder, pelletising, and materials handling configurations. Sometimes a customer will want to be sure that product specifications can be attained with a specific configuration before purchasing the system, he adds. US-based B&P Process Equipment has six pilot-


scale bays at its corporate headquarters and customer demonstration centre at Saginaw in Michigan for customers to test prior to purchasing new equipment. Pilot-scale equipment includes a Series-2 and Series-6 TriVolution Compounder, corotating twin-screw extruders (15, 19, and 50mm), a plough mixer, and a pressure vessel plough mixer. Tests can be run


Entek develops a screw design program


Entek’s new screw design software program is designed to allow customers to easily develop screw and barrel layouts for specific applications. The program offers drag-and-drop functionality on all components that customers need to specify - such as barrel sections, screws and metallurgy - and includes automatic calcula- tion of remaining space on the screw shafts. Safeguards prevent placement of certain elements where they do not belong – for example a kneading block in a vacuum section. The user can print out a final diagram, including part names and numbers. ❙ http://screwdesign.entek.com


58 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016 www.compoundingworld.com


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