This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
news Two more plasticisers on SVHC list


Two plasticisers are among nine substances of very high concern (SVHCs) which have been recommended for addition to the Authorisation List under the EU’s REACH Regulation. 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic


acid dihexyl ester, in branched nd linear forms, and dihexyl phthalate have both been listed because they are deemed toxic for reproduction. The move is part of the


seventh recommendation to prioritise SVHCs made by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). It follows a public


consultation that took place between November 2015 and February 2016 and considera- tion by the EU’s Member State


Committee, which adopted its opinion on 13 September 2016. All nine of the new addi-


tions were prioritised from the


The EU has added two more plasticisers to the REACH Authorisation list


Candidate List because of their high volume and widespread uses, which may pose a threat to human health, or for their potential to replace other substances already on the Authorisation List.


A final decision on their inclusion in the Authorisation List and on the dates by which companies will need to apply for authorisation to ECHA will be taken by the European Commission in collaboration with Member States and the European Parliament. ❙ http://echa.europa.eu


PTS opens up for sales and service in Mexico


US-based Polymer Technology & Services (PTS) has opened a new location at Guadalajara in Mexico. The company said that it aims to broaden its global efforts by reaching new customer bases via local representation. PTS, of Murfreesboro,


Tennessee, has been selling engineering compounds into Mexico for almost 20 years and has had an office with a sales


representative for the last two. Establishing PTS Mexico, the company said, will enable it to supply directly into Mexico with local warehousing and also to trade in Mexican pesos, as demanded by some customers. The new office will have


three employees covering sales liaison, logistics and customer service. It will sell the full range of more than 200 engineering thermoplastics


the company makes at its US compounding locations into the Mexican and wider Latin American markets. PTS said Mexico’s economy


has grown strongly on the back of manufacturing in recent year, most notably in the electronics, aerospace and automotive sectors. As a result, demand for engineering plastics has grown, partly for basic assembly in foreign-


owned “maquiladora” production plants, but increasingly in more sophisti- cated manufacturing opera- tions. PTS is targeting the latter, seeing a large unsatis- fied need for application development services and customised products. The move follows a recent


PTS collaboration agreement with FPL in India. ❙ www.ptsllc.com


Laser marking in focus for ELIX and BSH


Spain’s ELIX Polymers has worked with appliance maker BSH Electrodomésticos España to develop a new line of laser markable ABS products that the partners hope will extend the technology into new decorative areas. “Both we and ELIX Polymers are highly satisfied with the results


obtained during the collaboration carried out this year,” said Andrés Escartín, Head of Industrial Process Innovation at BSH España “This has allowed us to consider the extension of the aesthetic laser marker to a greater number of plastic parts in household appliances, reducing the subsequent painting or screen-printing stages, saving on post-treat- ment costs and reducing the environmental impact of the treatments.” ❙ www.elix-polymers.com


8 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016 www.compoundingworld.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92