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anti-counterfeiting | Technology Right: A


Polysecure detection


device. The


company says it will launch a low cost €100 device in 2017


cost of mobile detectors which can precisely authenti- cate product markers and thus the marked original products,” he says. Addressing this need, Polysecure will introduce a new generation of low cost fluorescence detectors during 2017. Moesslein says these will be priced below €100 while offering “more or less” the functionality of detectors that today cost more than €1,000.“This development was triggered by original manufacturers of industrial products. Their goal is that the authentication of their products becomes feasible for thousands of technical personnel at their custom- ers,” he says.


Recycling initiatives While not stepping back from its anti-counterfeiting activities, Polysecure has over the past two years been concentrating more on the application of its technology to tracer-based sorting (TBS) and recycling. Its aim it to develop a means of marking materials that are so similar that it is difficult or even impossible to separate with more conventional technologies. An example cited by CTO Martin Fahr is the EU-


sponsored Life Petcycle project, where the main objective is to create novel upcycling routes for PET bottles by the transfer of marker technology into the waste management sector. Aside from Polysecure, other companies involved in the project include Procter & Gamble and PolyOne. The Life Petcycle technology introduces fluorescent


Below: Jars containing fluorescent markers from Polysecure


particles into the PET polymer to allow optical laser- based detection of the bottles in an automated high- speed sorting process. The idea is that it will enable the use of more powerful and innovative detection and sorting systems that can identify and separate at source selected bottles from mixed waste streams. “The project will demonstrate how the sorting and recycling of plastics that are currently incinerated,


landfilled or only used for lower-quality PET can be used to create high-quality rPET (recycled polyethylene terephthalate) resource streams,” say the project coordinators. “Further, the project will test a high-qual- ity rPET waste stream as a resource for producing non-woven fibre materials for use in a wide variety of applications, such as automotive, personal hygiene, bedding/furnishings and technical/industrial applica- tions.” Polysecure is also involved in the Rewindo project in Germany for recycling PVC windows, which often combine parts made of unreinforced PVC (for aesthet- ics) and reinforced PVC (for strength). The company recently finished construction of what Moesslein claims to be the only industrial machine for tracer-based sorting for PVC windows. In this application area the company has an exclusive cooperation with Tracing Technologies in France, a pioneer in tracer-based sorting technology. According to Moesslein, thousands of tonnes of PVC


have already been marked on a fully industrial basis. “Fundamental to TBS is that there is a sufficient number of markers that can be excited to provide reliable signals, which can be distinguished in millisec- onds from other markers, from fluorescence of the host materials and independent from pigments and other additives in the host material,” he says. “TBS requires harmonisation and then standardisation. It can then be a very efficient sorting technology.”


Click on the links for more information: ❙ www.clariant.comwww.sicpa.comwww.teknorapex.comwww.addmaster.co.ukwww.microtracesolutions.comwww.plasticscolor.comwww.gabriel-chemie.comwww.polysecure.euwww.tracingtechnologies.fr


48 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016 www.compoundingworld.com


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