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Above:


electrification of cars will


create more demand for


flame retardant plastics for


connectors in and around the vehicle


additives | Flame retardants Like Chemtura and Albemarle, ICL is emphasising the


Increasing


importance of polymeric and reactive FR types. Tange points to applications in the building and construction sector, where ICL’s polymeric FR-122P has replaced HBCD in EPS and XPS. Effective stabilisation during processing is achieved with ICL’s polymeric brominated acid scavengers. The company also offers systems that enable PC glazing to reach UL-94 V0 at low thicknesses while keeping both high transparency and low haze. Polymeric and reactive FRs for electronic connectors


now include a brominated polyacrylate, FR-1025, which is suitable for wall thicknesses below 0.4mm thanks to “outstanding” mouldability and compatibility with ETPs as well as high CTI. ICL also has a wide range of high molecular weight brominated epoxies, which can be tailored to match specific needs in electrical applica- tions. FR-803P is a highly effective brominated PS for polyamides that offers high thermal stability and good electrical properties. As a sign of its continuing popularity, ICL recently substantially increased its capacity for this product. Another recent ICL development for enclosure


applications in PC, PC-ABS, PPE-PS alloys and other styrenics is Sol-DP, a solid phosphorus-based product supplied in a dust-free, pastille form. “Normally, BFRs are solids and phosphorus-based FRs are liquid so, if you need to replace your brominated system, you need to install a new feeding system,” Tange says. “Sol-DP avoids this.” ICL is also focusing on systems for ETPs and for


fibres that contain no antimony trioxide (ATO). “ATO and bromine work together very well but if you want an ecolabel, while polymeric BFRs will pass, alternatives to ATO are needed,” Tange says. Over at Lanxess (currently in the process of acquir- ing Chemtura) the emphasis is on phosphorus-based flame retardants that go mostly into polyurethane foams but also into TPUs and PVC. Heiko Tebbe, Senior


Properties of FRX Nofia homopolymer and copolymer grades in comparison to polycarbonate


Manager for Application Technology at the Rhein Chemie Additives’ plastic additive business (a Lanxess business unit), highlights a new grade, Disflamol 51092. This is a liquid aryl phosphate ester for TPU applica- tions such as cable, as well as some PVC applications such as coated fabrics. It has better thermal resistance than more traditional alkyl phosphates and, because it is a liquid, it has a plasticising effect. Tebbe also points to developments in FR systems for


biopolymers (he cites PLA and cellulose acetate), which are increasingly used in technical applications. Levagard TP LXS 51114 was originally developed for flexible foams in automotive but is also appropriate for cellulose acetate and potentially also PLA. Cellulose acetate generally requires a plasticiser so the new Levagard, which has plasticising properties, can fulfill a dual role. This additive is phosphorus based but uses a different chemistry from the company’s existing existing phosphate esters. Application examples include notebook displays, LCD screens and electronic housings requiring a UL 94 V-0 rating.


Changing the game Nofia is a novel high molecular weight polyphosphonate flame retardant from FRX, which claims to be the only company in the world to use the chemistry. The product has a molecular weight of around 100,000 and is sold in pellet form. “Our materials are the first polymeric form of phosphorus used as FR additives,” says President and CEO Marc Lebel. “Our enabling technology is successfully being adopted in a wide range of applica- tions for FR polymers.” FRX Polymers calls Nofia a “game-changing”


Source: FRX Polymers 18 COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016


product line of polymeric and reactive additives that address the global need for non-halogen flame retardant plastics. Lebel points out that, because Nofia is polymeric, it will not migrate out of the host plastic during compounding or in use. It also has minimal impact on host plastic properties.


www.compoundingworld.com


s


PHOTO: ICL


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