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additives | Flame retardants


Properties of custom blends made by reaction extrusion using polycarbonate, Nofia HM1100 polyphosphonate homopolymer,and Joncryl chain extender


PC (MVR 6 ml/10min, 300°C,1.2kg) [wt%] Nofia HM1100 [wt%] Joncryl 4400 [wt%] P [wt%]


MVR (260°C/2.16kg) [ml/10 min] Tg [°C]


Unnotched Impact (1.6mm) [J/m] Notched Impact (1.6mm) [J/m] UL94 rating


FAR 25.853 (0.8mm) Appearance


Source: FRX Polymers The FRX portfolio includes pure polyphosphonates, as


well as polyphosphonate-carbonate copolymers. Levels of phosphorus range from 4 to 6.5% in the copolymers to 10.5% in the homopolymer. Molecular weight is also highly controllable, so FRX also produces oligomers. Nofia copolymers CO3000, CO4000 and CO6000 can be


blended with other thermoplastics or used as standalone materials. Compounders with a reactive extrusion capability can make their own blends with polycarbonate using the Nofia homopolymer HM1100 with a chain extender such as BASF’s Joncryl. The end groups of Nofia oligomers can be modified in multiple ways, making it possible to use grades such as OL1001 and OL3001 as reactive components in thermoset applications. FRX has a manufacturing unit at Antwerp, in Belgium, in a chemical park operated by polycarbonate producer Covestro. It says this provides it with access to feedstocks common to melt process production of polycarbonates and polyphosphonates. Nofia production began there in early 2014. FRX is currently focused on


The effect of adding Adins Clay to EVA compounds containing ATH flame retardant (Red line: EVA with 65% ATH; Blue line: EVA with 62% ATH, 3% Adins)


Source: T Group


olsa


64 35 1


3.7 15


126°C


1,300 (NB) 1,000 (NB)


54 45 1


4.8 20


122°C


39 60 1


6.4 25


118°C


1,300 (NB) 1,300 (NB) 1,000 (NB)


100


V-0/0.8mm V-0/0.4mm V-0/0.4mm Class B


Class A Class A Clear pellets Clear pellets Clear pellets


growing its business in Asia and has just added a Chinese company-- CITIC Capital—to its list of strategic investors (which includes BASF and Evonik) and established a Chinese subsidiary. Lebel says the Nofia technology is being used


primarily for flame retardance but that it does offer some other features, one of which is transparency. He says it is possible to produce a fully transparent polycarbonate that has a UL 94 V-0 rating at 0.4 mm. At least one unidenti- fied customer is already producing such a compound. Successful trials have also been carried out in


production of fully transparent flame retardant thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) films and also TPU floor coatings. The company is also active in flame retardant PET applications, including transparent BOPET films as well as extruded foams for structural panels. Polyphosphonate-carbonate copolymer can also be used to create flame retardant PLA. And Nofia is being aimed at epoxies for coatings and copper-clad laminates, too, but FRX is not targeting polyamides. In highly-filled polycarbonate applications in


electronics and transport applications, Nofia polymers are said to show excellent adhesion to glass and carbon fibres. This allows the composite to retain outstanding mechanical properties and deliver excellent FR properties, while higher levels of reinforcements are possible with little to no impact on properties.


Synergistic approaches The recent K2016 trade show in Germany revealed considerable activity in synergistic FR systems. Spain’s Tolsa Group, which began serious marketing of doped sepiolite (magnesium silicate) clay synergists for plastics around two years ago, is just one example. It now offers two ranges, Adins Clay and Adins Fireproof. The first includes grades modified with either quater- nary ammonium salts or different silanes. Pablo


20


COMPOUNDING WORLD | December 2016


www.compoundingworld.com


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