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NEWS


HEAltH InEQUAlItIES REPoRt SHoWS WIDEnIng InEQUAlItY gAPS


the Department of Health has published the 2017 sub-regional report on health inequalities within Health & Social Care (HSC) trust and local government District (lgD) areas within the north of Ireland.


this report provides an up-to-date picture of health inequalities within HSC trusts and lgDs in relation to area differences in morbidity, mortality, utilisation and access to health and social services.


Key findings include: • health outcomes are generally worse in the most deprived areas within each trust/lgD when compared with those seen in the trust/lgD as a whole. large differences (health inequality gaps) continue to exist for a number of different health measures • over the period analysed, a larger number of indicators for each HSC trust saw widening inequality gaps than those where gaps had narrowed. this was also true for the majority of lgDs with the exception of fermanagh and omagh, Mid Ulster and Mid and East Antrim • as seen regionally, deprivation related inequality was most evident in indicators relating to alcohol and drug use, suicide/self-harm and teenage births • deprivation gaps relating to alcohol related admissions were among the most notable in all lgDs, ranging from 46-118 per cent higher in deprived areas than across the sub-region • similarly, drug admission rate inequality gaps were among the five largest gaps for the majority of sub-regions, with the exception of the South Eastern trust and lisburn & Castlereagh lgD, where the gaps were still relatively wide • alcohol-related admission and deaths rates both showed narrowing inequality gaps in around half of the sub-regions analysed, but in many instances these gaps remained large • the inequality gaps for either self-harm admissions and/or suicide were among the largest inequality gaps in every lgD area • the teenage birth rate for the most deprived areas within each of the trusts was at least twice that in the overall trust itself


30 - PHARMACY In foCUS


MEDICARE’S gREAt BooSt foR In PInK! CAMPAIgn


MediCare Pharmacy group has raised an outstanding £12,000 for Cancer focus northern Ireland’s 2016 In Pink! campaign that funds potentially life-saving breast cancer research at Queen’s University Belfast.


During october 2016, MediCare pharmacies across northern Ireland held Pink Party Day fundraisers that saw staff hosting a variety of different events including coffee mornings,


dressing in pink and pamper parties. Since october 2014, MediCare Pharmacy group has raised almost £40,000 by holding various In Pink! fundraising activities throughout their pharmacies.


‘I would like to thank all the MediCare staff and customers who worked so hard in organising and participating in the many fundraising events that happened in october,’


said Colin Deehan, Professional Services Manager with MediCare Pharmacy group. ‘We are delighted to be able to help contribute to Cancer focus nI’s In Pink! Campaign and to the important research it funds. this research project has the potential to make an enormous difference to the lives of many local women and we’re very proud to be able to support that.’


UCA PHARMACIES AnSWER SoS nI CAll!


UCA President, Cliff McElhinney from Urban Pharmacy, presents a cheque on behalf of the UCA to Chris McAteer and Lisa Toan


nearly every family in northern Ireland is affected in some way by alcohol abuse, so the annual Alcohol Awareness Week is designed to get people thinking about alcohol and how it affects families as a whole.


During last year’s Alcohol Awareness Week, SoS nI partnered with the UCA to run a fundraising and information campaign in over 250 pharmacies across northern Ireland. the campaign aimed to promote and


improve health around alcohol consumption, as well as highlight the services that SoS Bus provides and raise funds for the charity.


the campaign proved to be a major success, with more than £9000 raised during that week to assist SoS nI in making a real difference to children, young people and adults. there are over 250 dedicated SoS nI Volunteers who work on the streets during the busy night-time economy,


in nI schools educating and empowering young people around the safe use of alcohol and in our communities through the food and transport Programmes.


As part of the UCA/SoS nI campaign, customers were also encouraged to take information leaflets about SoS nI with them and keep the SoS Bus emergency number in their phones and encourage their friends and children to do the same.


BElfASt to HoSt CoSMEtIC CHRIStMAS SHoW


Christmas trading presents an important opportunity for pharmacy. Identifying the correct product mix - particularly for key trading periods such as Christmas - is vital and, as such, many distribution companies and brand owners have been visiting pharmacies one by one to present Christmas portfolios and opportunities.


now, a number of well-respected companies are to come together for the thirteenth year of the well- established Belfast Christmas Show.


this event, which will take place on Wednesday 3 and thursday 4 May at the Park Avenue Hotel, Belfast, will see a range of exhibitors including: Pharmacy Supplies, Rymer Distribution,


Kemneeds, John Doyle Distributors, DlK Photo, EMt and green Angel present their portfolios.


‘this is an excellent opportunity for independent pharmacy,’ said Paul Canning from Pharmacy Supplies. ‘We are very excited to be part of this and have no doubt that it will continue to go from strength to strength.’


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