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EXTERNAL ENVELOPE


The latest generation of solar control glass delivers higher levels of selectivity than ever before


Products such as these deliver glass facades with a centre pane U-value as low as 1.0 W/m2


K, while optimising


the solar control performance. This ability to combine the solar control and insulating benefits into one glass product puts the performance of the facade at the heart of a building’s energy saving strategy.


In terms of assessing how the energy consumption of a building can be minimised, the predictability of the way the glass coatings will perform over time, without degradation, provides a ‘fit-and- forget’ element for specifiers.


Knowing that the glass will perform to a given level reflecting heat in summer months means mechanical engineers and building managers can focus their efforts on managing other issues, such as the heat generated as a result of building use and occupancy using other mechanical and passive cooling solutions. With the solar control glass doing its job efficiently – maintenance-free – the reliance on such cooling solutions is reduced and energy consumption cut as a result. During colder months, the solar control glass aids thermal retention with its insulat-


ing properties. The low U-value of the glass gives architects the scope to use glazed facades as part of a highly insulated build- ing envelope – and model the insulating qualities in exactly the same way as for roofing, floors and walls.


The energy saving benefit comes with reduced reliance on heating systems given that the glass reflects heat back into the building. It also ensures that cold spots are reduced close up to the facade, something that building occupiers will often notice in buildings featuring earlier generations of glass. This helps stabilise internal tempera- tures, with fewer variations in performance to manage and consider. The product’s ability to harness good levels of light transmittance also means less reliance on artificial lighting during daytime hours which will help to significantly reduce energy consumption. This energy saving benefit is, of course, in addition to the health and well-being benefits associ- ated with maximising natural daylight in the workplace, including reduced absen- teeism and improved productivity.


Adrian Adams is Saint-Gobain Building Glass UK’s commercial market manager


bespoke roof lights...


MDM Glass & Glazing bespoke Roof Lights can really help to capture natural light and to create a feeling of extra space


•From a simple skylight to full glass roofing MDM Glass can do it all. •Roof Lights can make any building look stylish and ultra-modern. It can make a massive change to the building and to reverse it into something truly unique, grabbing attention of everyone who sees it. With the range of different styles and products available at MDM Glass the vision of your project can really come to the light.


•Have a look to our portfolio with some of our projects that may inspire you to start your own roof lights conception. Our products will make your home truly unique: cosy to stay and comfortable to work.


•MDM team is always pleased to give an advice about the glass and elegant finishing.


• Call us today or request a call back using the form at the bottom of the page and we will get back to you as soon as we can.


CALL US 020 8677 1380 EMAIL INFO@MDMGLASS.CO.UK VISIT THE WEBSITE WWW.MDMGLASS.CO.UK


MDM GLASS & GLAZING WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK ADF MARCH 2017


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