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BUILDING FOR EDUCATION PROJECT REPORT


Decorative casing solutions – the big cover up


to specify colours that not only adhere to their brand guidelines but also add to the customer experience. Encasement’s ‘Forma’ metal casings, for example, provide specifiers with a diverse range of options and can be specified with diameters from 250mm up to 1000mm or as square, rectangular and hexagonal forms, as well as unique custom profiles. While all of Encasement’s column casings


are suitable for interior use, its ‘Polyma’ GRP products and ‘Forma’ range, which can be manufactured from aluminium or stainless steel, are also widely used on exterior proj- ects due to their inherent weather resistance. Recent projects, such as Tetrosyl’s new


Porche West London


The interiors of many buildings, as well as some exteriors, would be considerably less attractive and practical, if it wasn’t for column casings and interior wall lining solutions. A bold statement perhaps, but column


casings are an essential part of contemporary building design and perform a vital function by providing an effective, stylish and immensely versatile method of concealing structural steelwork, concrete columns and in some cases, building services. While there may be very few people who


will stand back to admire laminated plywood column casings in schools, hospitals and retail outlets or brushed stainless steel wall cladding in a prestige office building or hotel, they play a key role in the aesthetics of countless building environments. The use of column casings has grown dramatically since the early 1980s where their primary role was purely to cover structural supports with comparatively little consideration as a method of adding visual


decoration to a building. Since then, the demand for wider choice


and increased aesthetics from design conscious architects, interior designers and specifiers has been a key influence on Peterborough based decorative casing specialist, Encasement, whose range has expanded and diversified considerably over the past ten years to become the most com- prehensive available in the UK. The company’s complete range includes


‘Circa’ and ‘Quadra’ which are manufactured from pre-formed plywood, alongside its ‘Forma’ metal casings, ‘Polyma’ GRP and ‘Gypra’ GRG product ranges. ‘Metza’, a specialised solution that provides mezzanine floor columns with up to 2 hours fire protec- tion is also available. Versatility is a key feature behind a diverse


range of projects where the column casing’s design has been used to accent an interior or provide a unique aspect to a building. This high degree of freedom enables major brands, particularly in the retail sector,


head office reception, Birmingham Dental Hospital and Winchester College, together with Porsche West London’s prestige showroom, Kia’s recently opened flagship premises on London’s Great West Road and Debenhams’ major store at Cheshire Oaks, all perfectly illustrate the versatility of ‘Forma’ column casing solutions. At Tetrosyl, the casings are a unique aero-


foil section, Birmingham’s Dental Hospital uses a 25 metre high semi-elliptical design, whilst at Porsche, Kia and Winchester College, the casings are circular, but use


Tetrosyl


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


ADF MARCH 2017


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