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42


BUILDING FOR EDUCATION PROJECT REPORT


EXTERIOR


A contrast has been achieved by Stride Treglown externally, specifying light-coloured brick on the building’s lower part beneath a seamed metal material with a brightly coloured finish


In addition to standard teaching classrooms – or ‘learning bases’ as they are now known – the UTC needs extensive specialist workshop and laboratory facilities in addi- tion to standard classrooms.


At the heart of the project is a light and airy triple height atrium created by the building’s triangular design. The atrium is located at the centre of this triangle, provid- ing a ‘Learning Hub’ which features an integrated dining, social, learning and working area that connects all three levels of the building together.


“The distinctive triangular shape came about because of the site available and a desire not to build too much on the playing fields,” explains Caroline Pitt. “That meant we have a very distinctive atrium area that links with the rest of the building. “There was funding for a triangular


block – and this makes the building more interesting.” She adds: “In the atrium, there


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


The guiding principle behind the design was to create a building that provides a high-quality, energy-efficient learning environment which feels more akin to a workplace than a traditional school


is clear lighting at the top with balustrades around them.”


The building also features a two-storey activity hall, as well as a lecture theatre. The clean aesthetic of the building also reaches out to the engineering ethos with bright colours, crisp edges and clear expres- sion and celebration of functional elements.


ADF MARCH 2017


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