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HOTELS PROJECT REPORT


BUILDING PROJECTS


JW MARRIOTT VENICE RESORT + SPA ITALY


33


Island life


James Parker interviews the architect behind an award-winning hotel masterplanning project on a Venetian island which sensitively re-used a variety of old buildings in an elegant new context


A


n artificial island in Venice’s lagoon is the location of a new high-end Marriott resort which is a new composition of restored and enhanced existing buildings, creating a beautiful, laid- back retreat. This new identity as a secluded island, away from the bustle of Venice itself, is somewhat in contrast with the place’s history, its relative isolation having lent it other uses in the past.


ADF MARCH 2017


Located a mile south of the city, the 16 hectare Sacca Sessola (since renamed the more fragrant-sounding Isola delle Rose) began construction in 1860, with its very prosaic purpose being a fuel dump. Since then a variety of medical buildings have been constructed on the island, including in the 1930s a large T-shaped ‘Pulmonary Hospital’ which was closed in the 1970s. It became a ruin, until a restoration


CANALS REOPENED


The approach to the refurbished main hotel building is enhanced by an authentic ‘Venetian’ canal – reopened in the architects’ masterplan © JW Marriott Venice


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