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Film Review


Bittersweet By Mike Kemble


And the best film goes too….La La Land. No actually, it should have read Moonlight. Dear oh dear. On the biggest night in the film calendar, how did Oscar get it so wrong? Poor Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. The presenting pair were given the wrong envelope,


although you’d have thought


they would have been able to read between the lines when no-ticing that Emma Stone was the named person on the inside, and should have been alert to the fact that she’d already picked-up her best actress award a few moments before. Per-haps that both are a little long in the tooth from their Bonnie and Clyde days is being a bit too heartless, but unfortunately they’ll be part of the biggest cock-up in the 89 year history of the Academy Awards. The fact that they were given the wrong envelope by representatives from PwC, the international professional services company who have man-aged the balloting process for 83 consecutive years and are charged with guarding the en-velopes, and which are handed to the presenters just before they go on stage, won’t take the spotlight off Beatty and Dunaway one iota in the years to come. You get the sinking longstanding relationship with Oscar may now be at an unforgettable end.


feeling that PwC’s


To the credit of team La La Land, they quickly and magnanimously moved off centre stage as the Moonlight ensemble were able to gather themselves in the immediate shock and claim a well-deserved Best Film Award. The most unfortunate thing is that it will more than likely deflect some of the attention from the other winners during what was a fantastically successful night up to that point, along with what is surely a bittersweet moment for all concerned. Yet over the longer term, the attention it will bring both films can only be positive, with the controversy creating even greater publicity to two films that while very different in style and nature, are thoroughly deserving of all the plaudits they’ve already received. And if that means more people are going to go out of their way to watch something they may not have done previously, then there’s definitely more sweetness than sour, and that has to be a good thing right?


Films to look out for over the coming months...


Kong: Skull Island (10th March): Tom Hiddleston and Samuel L. Jackson star in this reimaging of the King Kong legend in what looks like a fabulous all-action extravaganza.


The Salesman (17th March): This outstanding Iranian film from Director Asghar Farhadiw won the Best Foreign Film Oscar through its heart wrenching telling of a marital breakdown closely linked to Arthur Miller’s outstanding play, Death of a Salesman.


The Lost City of Z: (24th March): This film tells the incredible true story of British explorer who journeys into the Amazon to find evidence of a previously unknown, advanced civilization that once existed many years before.


Ghost in the Shell (31st March): Scarlett Johansson stars as Major, a cyber-enhanced human in the not-too-distant future, who stumbles across her real existence in this Matrix-style sci-fi drama based on the internationally acclaimed Japanese Manga series.


Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (28th April): Chris Pratt and company are back to rule the cosmos once again in this eagerly anticipated follow-up from Marvel Studios.


See you next time! around SADDLEWORTH 34 www.aroundsaddleworth.co.uk


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