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HOTEL REVIEW


London and New York. The pieces selected for the Pula hotel are nature-themed – trees and plants portrayed in minimalist style in muted shades of green and blue. Design details borrow from these colours, and while not trying to copy nature, subtly suggest it. The building’s original 1980s façade has


been retained, as have many existing materials, elements and even pieces of furniture, at times paying homage to the ex-Yugoslav hotel aesthetic, rather than hiding it. The most impressive feature has to be the


vast lobby, with floor-to-ceiling windows (both front and rear façades) affording a free flow of space between the interior and the exterior, as well as amazing sea views reminding the visitor exactly why they have come here. Originally, the lobby would have been divided into several smaller public spaces – with a


communal television area, for example – in the days before individual guestrooms each had their own TV. Now it is a free-form public space, with a no-fuss reception and small groups of mismatched armchairs and sofas in subtle tones – olive green, plum, beige and fuchsia. Suspended above the elliptical stairwell, Artemide Mercury lights designed by Ross Lovegrove feature large metallic bio- morphic pebbles floating below an aluminium disk, while the free-standing white Moonlight globe lights next to the piano emit a gentle romantic glow after dark. The big white cylindrical lampshades, used throughout the public spaces, were designed by the architects themselves. Opposite the Lobby bar, one of the ArtLink canvasses depicts trees and a bird, and the same tree motif is etched in the front of the backlit glass bar. Another discreet


082 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2013 WWW.SLEEPERMAGAZINE.COM


ABOVE: Tree motifs, taken from artworks supplied by ArtLink, are etched into the backlit glass bar above which hang cylindrical lampshades custom-designed by Scott Brownrigg


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