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EVENTS


RIGHT: Suppliers and designers from across Europe displayed the latest in cutting-edge and contemporary hospitality design, encompassing everything from traditional interiors inspired by the outdoors to modern minimalist pieces


business parks. Not to mention the added benefit of speed to market and willingness of banks to lend in these situations. Of course, there were words of warning regarding the unknown horrors often discovered during the conversion of old buildings. Christophe Hoffmann, CEO of 25hours


Hotels, took to the stage in Sleep Talking in which he discussed the recent opening of 25hours Hotel HafenCity, a newbuild property in Hamburg shortlisted for two European Hotels Design Awards. While Hoffman admitted it was no easy feat using different designers for each 25hours project, he believes this is what keeps the brand fresh and individual. He also revealed plans to grow the portfolio but maintained that each hotel would remain unique. The final panel of the day explored the recent explosion of pop-up hotels with designers and initiators of temporary hospitality experiences. Claus Sendlinger, founder and CEO of Design Hotels and winner of The Outstanding Contribution Award at the European Hotel Design Awards, spoke of Papaya Playa, a pop-up project in Tulum, Mexico. After falling in love with a stretch of coastline, Sendlinger moved his family to the resort and set about creating the 85-cabana project. As he explained, the concept is about selling an experience, rather than just a room. Jonathan Manser, Managing Director of The Manser Practice and creative mind behind the portable Snoozebox, believed that the concept gives the opportunity for a wider range of hotels in better locations, particularly during one-off events. Delegates turned out in force for the


interactive elements of the programme in which they were given the opportunity to question key senior executives from the industry. The Round Tables, hosted by Daniel Englender, Managing Director at FF&E procurement firm Benjamin West, returned for a second successive year following sell- out attendance in 2011. Table hosts from Fox Linton Associates, HVS, Host Hotels & Resorts, and Porto Montenegro were quizzed about their current projects, future developments and outlook for 2013 during a lively 90-minutes.


The success of the Round Tables prompted organisers to introduce a new session for 2012, entitled Question Time. Following the format of the BBC topical debate show, the session featured a panel of experienced leaders and decision makers including Chris Luebkeman, Director of Global Foresight & Innovation at Arup, and Rajiv Puri, Vice President of Project and Design Management, Architecture and Construction at Marriott International answering burning questions posed by the audience.


Summing up the success of Sleep 2012, Brand Director Kali Nicholson commented: “The Sleep team are thrilled to have welcomed so many visitors from the UK and across the globe to this year’s event... The quality of international visitors only strengthens our position as Europe’s most established event for the high-end hotel design industry and perfectly positions us to expand into international territories.”


Turn over for more on The Sleep Hotel, The Sleep Bar, and European Hotel Design Awards...


110 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2013 WWW.SLEEPERMAGAZINE.COM


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