This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
MEETING…JEAN PHILIPPE NUEL


too far from my style, but it amuses me


to try to decrypt the brand identity of each chain, which inspires me to go in a particular direction. At the same time, it must also correspond with my own sensibility.”


“To know how to be modern while


incorporating our roots, a culture, is the axis of my work,” says Nuel, who delves into the atmosphere of the city, nosing out a specific history for each building, in places that often have an extremely strong relationship with their location. For the Palais de Justice in Nantes, he worked with architect Jacques Cholet and the architects from the Bâtiments de France (the French historic buildings commission) to open the building up to the city, both through the facilities (art gallery, bar, restaurant) and architecturally, by a glass wall behind the colonnade and allegorical sculpture of Justice on the façade “It was my idea to open up the lobby in transparency towards the town, previously the tribunal was introverted, now it is extrovert,” he says.


“In Nantes, there was a difficulty – or


opportunity – in that the building’s heritage is very present even inside, because you go straight into the ‘salle des pas perdus’ or central hall of the law courts. I kept the criminal courtroom as the restaurant,


L’Assises, to play with this history, to preserve the heritage but at the same time write a new history for the site. It’s a sort of balancing act between history, assuming the place’s new purpose and staying in contact with the city.” The judge’s bench has been replaced by a stack of wine bottles, the panelling is now a more welcoming white, and touches of bright colours characteristic of Radisson appear in pink and red restaurant seating, spots on corridor carpets, the bright red bar inserted into a corner of the lobby and the occasional glossy lacquered glass door. More than just colour or materials, Nuel likes to conceive his hotels as a sort of route, with an approach to volumes that undoubtedly comes from his architectural background. “I am also inspired by literature and cinema. I like the building to be perceived like the opening sequences in a film as the person enters the place. I am always fascinated by those films where through the music and opening shots you are immediately plunged into an atmosphere. Even if my vocabulary is quite minimalist, the idea is to work as much through atmosphere as by purely formal style. To work on the atmosphere is to confer a life, whereas if one just works on the formal aspects it is too fossilised: the moment you move a chair, your decoration is broken. I try to keep as a reference how the client


034 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2013 WWW.SLEEPERMAGAZINE.COM


ABOVE: At the Radisson Blu Nantes, Nuel has transformed the central hall of the law courts into a lobby, with pink and red accents to the seating and the insertion of a bright, lacquer bar in a corner of the lobby


sequences in a film. I am fascinated by the way music


and opening shots immediately


plunge you into an atmosphere.”


“I like buildings to be perceived like the opening


Pic: Christian Zachariasen


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148