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THE DRAWING BOARD


THE AAYUMUMBAI


GHM (General Hotel Management Ltd) has unveiled plans for a new luxury hotel to be housed in the top five floors of Mumbai’s tallest commercial building. The tower has been designed by Sandeep Shikre & Associates (SSA Architects) and GKK Works and will feature interiors by Jaya Ibrahim.


Spread over a 5-acre parcel of land and towering 203 metres above the Dadar area of Mumbai, Kohinoor Square Central Tower is a 50-storey mixed-use development of office, commercial, retail and residential space. The all-suite hotel overlooks historic Shivaji


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Park and offers views of the Arabian Sea to the west, and the island mainland to the east. Interior designer Jaya Ibrahim, who previously partnered with GHM on The Legian Bali, The Chedi Muscat and The Nam Hai, will lend his award-winning aesthetic to The Aayu’s spaces, including its 42 suites ranging in size from 65m2


to 155m2 . The hotel will also be the setting for


India’s first restaurants by the world’s most decorated chef Joël Robuchon, and culinary star Hide Yamamoto. Robuchon, the only chef to be awarded 28 Michelin stars, will open his 8th L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon at The Aayu, while Yamamoto will mastermind a


JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2013 WWW.SLEEPERMAGAZINE.COM


second restaurant showcasing new generation Japanese cuisine from its charcoal Robata grill, homemade ramen noodle bar and sushi and sake counter. Other facilities include a library lounge and


bar, cigar and cognac lounge, exclusive malt bar and capacious boardroom on the 49th floor. The hotel’s spa will be unmoored from a fixed location, with all treatments conducted in the haven of a guest’s room. The Aayu’s 50th-floor rooftop terrace will be home to Mumbai’s highest bar, complemented by a swimming pool and deck with ocean views, as well as a landscaped courtyard. The property is scheduled to open in December 2013.


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