This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
EVENTS


ABOVE: Agua Fabrics showcased its new faux leather Taurus range with the help of a life-sized bull RIGHT: Various brands used Sleep 2012 to introduce their latest collections, with vibrant and contemporary textiles proving a prominent trend


for wet-room installations, while bathroom


manufacturer Vado took the opportunity to unveil its new super slim 500mm square Aquablade shower head, which it demonstrated via a fully-working display. UK fabric company Sekers launched its new Marisol, Sintra, Aros, Volante and Lexi upholstery collections, while Morgan Furniture showed contemporary chair collections Lucca and Modena. Kaldewei revealed its first ever electronic panel for baths, Comfort Select, alongside its latest floor level shower with integrated wall outlet, Xetis. Meanwhile visitors to the Hansgrohe stand got the chance to see the new Radiance Select E120 shower, and Skopos debuted its new luxury print fabric collection, Erddig & Elle. Once again Sleep hosted an exceptional


two-day conference programme that saw delegates congregating to listen to the industry’s key figureheads discussing the most pressing issues for international hotel design, development and investment. Moderated


by industry journalist and consultant Guy Dittrich and Hotel Analyst Editor Andrew Sangster, the programme included round table discussions, presentations and question and answer sessions. Richard Seymour, co-founder of design and innovation consultancy Seymourpowell, delivered the opening keynote offering a fascinating insight into his work that has seen him re-invent the horse-riding saddle, create the world’s first cordless kettle, and design interiors for Richard Branson’s commercial spaceline Virgin Galactic. As one of Europe’s best-known commentators on the future of design, Seymour explained his ethos of “making things better for people” and putting “anthropology before technology”. One of Seymour’s most futuristic projects that is now becoming a reality is Aircruise, a luxury hotel that floats in the sky. As he explained, the kite- shaped structure is over 800 feet tall and will float like a large balloon over cityscapes and


106 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2013 WWW.SLEEPERMAGAZINE.COM


landscapes. The first model is expected to be moored for up to 12 months before taking to the skies.


Looking to the future of hospitality, Andrew Sangster gave a short presentation on ‘Why The Hotel Industry Will Save The World’. Quoting statistics from the WTTC, Sangster explained that the travel and tourism industry is currently worth over US $6tn and will to grow at a rate of 4% per year over the next decade. The industry as a whole also accounts for 9% of global GDP and employs 10% of the work force. Examining the repercussions of the shift of economic power from West to East, Sangster addressed the rapid growth of the middle classes in the Asian nations and its positive impact on the global tourism industry, not least for hotel developers and investors. The first panel of the day examined the design of the back-of-house, in association with The Sleep ReardonSmith Student Award. This rarely seen and often neglected space was the subject of a competition in


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148