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HOTEL REVIEW


ABOVE: The reception room features an original stone fireplace alongside Pierre Paulin’s Chair F444, Nomad floor lamps by Niclas Hoflin and a vintage flat weave rug sourced by Studioilse, as was the antique cabinet to the right OPPOSITE PAGE: Bathrooms are clad in locally sourced Gotland limestone and have polished brassware fixtures


created an additional 20% of space. And what a space it is. In developing


her ideas around the interiors Mix felt that the minimalist, slightly masculine and Scandinavian bias of many local design practices would not be right for Ett Hem. It was whilst having dinner in the Mathias Dahlgren restaurant at Stockholm’s Grand Hotel – with which Ett Hem competes in price, if not size or style – that Mix saw what she wanted: the mélange of Scandinavian and international style by Ilse Crawford of Studioilse in London. Initially hesitant about contacting a designer with such a reputation, Mix finally called and a trusting relationship developed. There are many historical references


within this heritage building. Antique chandeliers, lit by real candles, were


042 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2013 WWW.SLEEPERMAGAZINE.COM


sourced by Studioilse. Ceramic ovens were added to those guestrooms that did not have one already. “These elements are part of the subtle reinterpretation of the historic listed architectural ‘frame’. What is in front, the furniture and art, can then be contemporary and will continue to evolve,” explains Crawford of Studioilse’s on-going involvement in the project. “Even Christmas decorations fall into our remit. These can completely change the character if they are not considered. A good interior is never finished; it lives with those that live in it. That is why the overarching concept needs to be strong, yet flexible.” Studioilse has also created a 100-page


housekeeping book detailing everything from how the bathroom is laid out to the room-service trays. “Design is about the


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