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HOTEL REVIEW


hotel, the building’s industrial character has been beautifully preserved. Its concave corner entrance accommodates a sign by Tom Fruin, created from salvaged pieces of signage, and neon, hand riveted to spell out the word ‘hotel’ down the exterior of the building. Inside, original pine beams, masonry, arched windows and cast-iron columns combine with vintage mid-century furnishings by the likes of Hans Wegner and Thonet. The mix of authentical industrial heritage and hip modernity that defines much of Brooklyn’s contemporary culture is reflected in the building. Atop the original five-storey redbrick structure is a new three-storey glass and aluminum addition that references the hotel’s existing factory windows while dramatically pulling the building into the present. The views from the sixth floor bar and river facing


rooms are incredible – an uninterrupted 180- degree panorama of the iconic Manhattan skyline, that any hotel located in Manhattan itself would struggle to beat. The Wythe has been created by a team including Australian hotelier Peter Lawrence, local restaurateur Andrew Tarlow, and property developer Jed Walentas, whose father’s firm Two Trees Management transformed Brooklyn’s Dumbo neighbourhood with a series of warehouse conversions. This trio collaborated with Morris Adjmi Architects and design firm Workstead on the interiors. The hotel’s 72 guestrooms feature 13- foot high original timber ceilings, oversized windows, heated concrete floors, and works by local artists. Beds were custom made from reclaimed ceiling timbers by Dave Hollier


028 JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2013 WWW.SLEEPERMAGAZINE.COM


ABOVE: Desks and beds in the guestrooms were created by Dave Hollier Woodwork & Design. Wallcoverings are an original design by Dan Funderburgh, Printing by Flavor Paper. Thonet chairs were sourced from Chair Factory and DWR. Bedside lights are Bestlite and the bedside table is by SAW Furniture


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