This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
GENDER: A KEY DIMENSION 141


• Minimize the negative environmental impacts of plantations on the local community.


Homestead Food Production Homestead food production (HFP) has attracted attention as an agricultural devel- opment strategy, particularly for households with limited land. Linkages among gender, agriculture, health, and nutrition are easily traced: the strategy aims to increase dietary diversity using household labor intensively on small gardens within the homestead, allowing women to grow a variety of fruits and vegetables and tend small livestock while fulfilling their domestic and child care responsibilities. Helen Keller International (HKI), an international nongovernmental organiza-


tion (NGO), pioneered this model to address vitamin-A deficiency in Bangladesh in the 1980s. HKI expanded and adapted the program for Cambodia, Nepal, and the Philippines in the late 1990s, through strategic partnerships with more than 200 local nongovernmental and governmental organizations. The HFP model was broadened to include small animal husbandry in order to address multiple micronutrient deficiencies, including iron and zinc; the program in Cambodia included chicken and duck production in addition to vegetables. This aspect, too, is consistent with women’s asset accumulation strategies: women tend to own and care for small livestock, while men are responsible for larger animals. HFP programming has evolved to address other aspects of food insecurity,


including improved incomes and livelihoods, community development, and the empowerment of women. Programs operate in several countries of South Asia, Southeast Asia and the Pacific, and Sub-Saharan Africa. A number of research stud- ies and reviews of the nutrition impacts of HFP programs indicate that the effective HFP models take into account several gender-related factors: women’s control over assets; nutrition education and behavior change communication about allocation of household resources to safeguard vulnerable household members, such as mothers and young children; and key messages regarding optimal infant and young-child feeding and care practices. Gender norms differ across countries and contexts, so the appropriate means


for addressing gender concerns will also differ. In Bangladesh, programs built on women’s traditional role as providers of food and care within the household; at the same time, they addressed constraints on women’s access to agricultural land and credit, as well as norms that favor social seclusion. Programs have used women’s groups to introduce homestead vegetable production, creating income sources that women control. In the HKI Burkina Faso homestead food production program, project staff led preliminary communitywide sensitizations, to make men as well as women aware of the importance of maternal nutrition and improved maternal


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230