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Above: FRASCA TruFlite H Simulator


COMPLEX SYSTEMS CAN BE REPLICATED IN A SAFE ENVIRONMENT AND THEIR USE REHEARSED UNTIL “FAMILIARITY IS KING”


turn of a dial. In this case, a motion platform in not


required because the visual cues are sufficient to convey the simulation and create an environment conducive to learning instrument flying skills. In Gloucester, England there are 2 JAA approved ELITE FTDs set up to compli- ment the single pilot multi-engine IR program and stu- dents will learn to build their scan, practice European instrument procedures and experience the pressures of coping with an emergency, while continuing to accurate- ly fly the aircraft in clouds. As pilots move into more complicated helicopters,


aircraft typically have more engines and more systems, which increase the potential for emergencies to occur. This is where simulation becomes very valuable.


FEBRUARY 2012 46


Complex systems can be replicated in a safe environ- ment and their use rehearsed until “familiarity is king”. The Academy is in the process of upgrading its AATD Bell 206 FTD at the Titusville Campus.


Learning to


operate this relatively simple single engine turbine air- craft can be conducted in the FTD before climbing into the cockpit of the real aircraft. Those checks need to be learned and the start sequence can be rehearsed many times. Now, throw in a hot start, a hung engine, or maybe a simulated fire on start. Using the FTD first to become proficient in these procedures, could potentially save many dollars in the real world. Flight simulation has many uses and as the technol- ogy of the devices continues to improve I hope we will


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